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“Knowledge Fight: We’re a Couple of Dudes Who Like To Drink Novelty Beverages and Talk a Little Bit About Alex Jones…”

Unofficial meetup for fans of the Knowledge Fight podcast. Not associated with Dan or JorDAN.

WonkFest may have been cancelled, but Policy Wonks can still meet up in a COVID safe way. BYO-everything, and come chat about Alex Jones with people who also listen to frankly absurd levels of content about the man. (Maybe try and avoid chocolate, we don’t want a Raptor-Princess attack)

If you’ve never listened to Knowledge Fight, and you’re confused about this ‘Alex Jones’ guy, the boys recommend starting with this episode. Please enjoy the wild ride.

Boring/Important COVID Info:

  • Tickets are limited because we can only accommodate 16 people safely. Please don’t show up with an unexpected +1.
  • You will be asked to sanitise your hands on arrival and to wear a mask when not eating or drinking.
  • If you have any additional safety questions or requests please contact Fiona.

The Coronavirus Tech Handbook provides a space where technologists, specialists, civic organisations and public & private institutions can collaborate on a rapid and sophisticated response to the outbreak. It is a dynamic resource with many hundreds of contributors that is evolving very quickly. Its design is easy to read, intuitive to use, and allows for easy long term engagement. With your help, we can produce a comprehensive library of all known resources for mitigating every impact of the pandemic.

https://coronavirustechhandbook.com

On Thursday 9 April, local councils will release details of who is standing for the May elections. At this event, we’ll be collecting all that data together into one open database.

Stay for the whole session or just drop in whenever you can — every little helps!

We’ll provide drinks and snacks!

You’ll need a laptop, but no technical knowledge.

You might like to sign up for an account at candidates.democracyclub.org.uk before the event.

The Echo Chamber Club brings together various experts and specialists who want to improve information environments. You could be an academic, a journalist, a think-tanker, a technologist or a policy-maker who works on anything related to this field. This could be - disinformation, misinformation, information warfare, truth-making, conspiracy theories, data privacy, data politics, political advertising, microtargeting, transparency, mediatisation, normalisation, echo chambers, filter bubbles, herd thinking and more.

The purpose of this meet up is to meet people who are working in adjacent fields to enable collaboration. However, we will also have some exciting provocations lined up to help stimulate conversation.

The meet up will be hosted by Alice Thwaite, founder of the Echo Chamber Club. We will provide snacks and drinks. Please do give us a donation to help us fund the event and buy refreshements.

  • Arrivals from 6.30 pm
  • Provocations from 7pm (speakers tbc)
  • The event ends when the last person exits

Every month we meet up to collaborate on projects, to discuss progress and to learn together. This is a meetup for engineers of all stripes (hackers, makers, designers and other technologists) who wish to contribute their spare time and talents to radical projects, or work on their own projects. The evening will kickoff with a short introduction round, after which you can proceed to work on your own project, join someone else’s or join one of ours.

What is a radical project? Here at Radical Engineers, we have been seeking and contacting organisations which aim to fundamentally change our economic, political and social systems to enhance human autonomy and social equality. We discuss their projects and clarify any technical challenges or needs they may have so that when they are presented to you, our community, you know that they are properly considered and genuinely useful. Our vetting process means that you will only be working on projects which will help not just to fix the symptoms of our economic systems, but aim to contribute to systemic change itself.

Not an engineer? That’s ok too! You would be surprised at the variety of skills needed for projects. Spreadsheet sprites, word wizards and pixel pirates are valued guests and we could always use a hand scoping out new projects!

See some projects Radical Engineers are working on at www.radicalengineers.com

The Metropolitan Police have begun deploying controversial facial recognition cameras across London. Future Advocacy, a think tank focused on artificial intelligence and emerging technologies, is currently exploring the potential implications this may have for people of colour and religious minorities. Studies have found that facial recognition technology can often result in discriminatory outcomes for individuals with darker skin.

As part of our research, we are looking to bring together young people of colour at a workshop in East London to discuss their views on the technology. It will be an informal event and refreshments will be provided (including pizza).

For any questions, please feel free to get in touch with Areeq Chowdhury at [email protected]

This project is being supported by the Joseph Rowntree Reform Trust.

A recently released FOIA request made to the National Security Agency brought their internal Python training course to light…

If you’d like to learn Python direct from NSA materials, join us on March 28th in London for our first NSA Python study group session!

Click here for more details!

An event to celebrate the launch of Good Services, a new book about how to design services that work for users.

Good service is a book about what makes a good service, and how to design services that work for users. It took a lot of work to make, so we’re having a party to celebrate!

Talks by Lou Downe and Sarah Richards about all things services - good, bad and ugly - followed by a conversation between both speakers on writing books about emergent disciplines.

And if that wasn’t enough, music, a special gin from The Electric Spirit Co and an opportunity to buy posters, stickers and (more!) books.

There will be live music after the talks and a promise of a party atmosphere.

Talk by Sarah Richards

Founder of the content design movement, Sarah pioneered the standards during her 10-year career with the UK government. As head of content design for the Government Digital Service (GDS), Sarah created and implemented the content strategy for the GOV.UK website.

Talk by Lou Downe

Director of Housing and Land transformation for the UK Government, based at Homes England and author of Good Services - a book about how to design services that work. They were previously Director of Design for the UK Government, where they established the cross-government standards for good services and founded the discipline of service design, building a community of over 3,000 designers, user researchers and content designers across government.

Gin by Electric Spirit Co.

Founded by James Porteous (ex EY Seren and Engine, now distiller extraordinaire). James has been a long term service design friend through the years, and gave it up to distill amazing gin that just so happens, matches the colour of the book!

Music from a live band, followed by Sarah Drummond (aka. DJ Drummondbass).

Party and Talks Schedule

  • 18:00 - Arrivals
  • 18.30 - Welcomes
  • 18:40 - Talk by Sarah Richards
  • 19:10 - Talk by Lou Downe
  • 19:30 - In conversation with Sarah and Lou, with questions from the audience
  • 20:00 - Shake a leg and celebrate!

Gen:Impact was set up to connect young professionals in London working to have social impact. Our goal is to provide a casual setting to exchange ideas, build relationships, and collaborate towards social change. Whether you’re a teacher, a civil servant, an impact investor or you work in the charitable sector, our work is aligned by the fact that we work to make the world a better place. Meet similar people and hear inspiring talks from peers!

  • 7:00 - 7:30 PM - Arrivals - Arrive and meet.
  • 7:30 - 8:30 PM - Speakers - Learn about exciting projects in the impact space from your peers
    • Beatrix Pitel, Fawcett Society - Fawcett Society is a charity campaigning for gender equality and women’s rights at work. They publish research and bring together politicians, academics and activists to tackle issues such as closing the gender pay gap and secure equal political representations.
    • Anna Fraser, Social Finance - After studying Human Computer Interaction Design, Anna worked in the Home Office in user research across immigration and law enforcement. She worked to understand and champion the needs of people using the services, researching with a wide range of users including vulnerable people, and people with access needs. Since then, she has moved to Social Finance, working to embed user research in projects across a range of complex social issues.
    • More tbc!
  • 8:30 - 10 PM - Networking - Chat and share a drink with your peers in the impact community

Org/speaker bios:

Join us to hear about research into the use of highly intrusive monitoring technologies in children’s lives at school, after school, and beyond the school gates. Hear what you can do to help the campaign to make all school data safe, fair and transparent.

The creeping capability of commercial school safeguarding software now includes imposed surveillance at home. Companies that once offered only filtering and blocking now monitor individuals on screen content and searches. Typing words that match keywords libraries of thousands of terms can trigger a risk flag.

Advancing technology enables ever more one-sided opaque access to information about children, building profiles, even taking their photos via the webcam.

But there is no discussion of its growing risks or transparency to schools or families about how it works.

defenddigitalme has obtained statistics using Freedom of Information requests that suggest 70% of schools in England use web monitoring software, and a growing trend to monitor personal devices beyond the school playground.

Parents want to know how these flags and watchwords are being used about their children. Under a third of parents polled believe their school use these tools. None of the 400 school policies reviewed by defenddigitalme explain it.

Will the Online Harms agenda normalise or even seek to legalise this gross invasion of private and family life?

Speaker: Jen Persson @TheABB from defenddigitalme

Further reading: https://defenddigitalme.com/2018/12/response-to-school-pupils-being-spied-on-through-webcams-and-school-web-monitoring-software

The sell out corn-based snack event is back. It’s Wine and Wotsits time.

You say wot?

That’s right, there aren’t enough wotsits in campaigners lives, so a few times a year we co-ordinate people coming together to share some of their successes. It’s a pecha kucha format, which means approx 5 presentations of 20 slides, each lasting 20 seconds. It will be an opportunity to hear from cutting edge speakers doing exciting things. Previous speakers include those from Save the Children, Shelter, WWF, Unlock Democracy, Which?, Change.org, National Autistic Society, Care2, Let Toys be Toys, Transform Justice and many more. If you have something you’d love to talk about, please let us know!

Wot Wot Who?

We’ll be unveiling the full list of speakers over the next few weeks.

How many tickets are there?

About 125. We always sell out, so please grab a ticket early to avoid disappointment, and if you can’t make it let us know so someone else can grab your spot.

How does it work?

You show up with whatever you want to drink (wine, fizz, non-alcoholic, whatever takes your fancy), we provide the wotsits and some cups. Rebels sometimes bring onion rings or monster munch.

You have a great evening, make friends with strangers and learn a bunch.

This is an event for anyone with an interest in the labour movement.

Too often in our movement, technology has been touted as the answer to all our problems. Clearly, it’s not. But clearly, in 2020, we’ve got to wield it effectively to build power and coalitions across the movement. 120 years after labour unions founded the Labour Party on the basis of collective action, are we making the most of the tools of the 21st century?

We’ll hear from Brian Young, Executive Director of Action Network in the US, where trade unions and activists got together and decided to stop buying technology owned by hedgefunds. Instead they built a coalition first and then the movement decided what technology it wanted and then they created and owned it themselves. This technology has powered the Womens March, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Sunrise Movement, the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) and Stop School Cuts here in the UK.

Brian will share experiences of building that coalition culture in the states, how they’ve started to change the way they think about tech so that it serves organisers and activists rather than the other way round.

It’s not about one set of tools over another, we want to think about how we build and use technology more effectively to build the power of the labour movement.

Tea & pastries from 2.30pm with a talk and Q&A to start at 3pm.

At a time when successful startups are under growing scrutiny, when too many people are being left out of the value startups create, it’s clear: we need better options. One critical leverage point is the “exit”—the holy grail for most ambitious startups—the moment when the company is sold to another company or a new set of investors. These kinds of outcomes guide startups’ mission and purpose from the very beginning. What if there were another kind of goal to aspire toward?

Already, mission-oriented startups and funds are working on making “Exit to Community” or E2C possible, one experiment at a time. Meanwhile, the likes of Uber and Airbnb are seeking ways to share equity more broadly with their worker-users. Community ownership could be a new way forward for the future of work, data, and innovation. At this workshop, we’ll pool our knowledge and experience to identify pathways for making community ownership more available in the startup economy and its surrounding mythology.

Do you want to improve your digital security? Do you keep putting it off? We’re a collective of feminist cybersecurity researchers and activists, and we want to help you access free tools and resources to protect your data. Join us for a free, practical, hands-on workshop exploring how digital security affects your life.

Please consider bringing a laptop, smartphone, or any data-collecting device you own, as the workshop includes a hands-on tech support session. Snacks and drinks will be provided!

This project is a form of “action research”—a type of research which combines research with activism to understand a problem and find solutions. In other words, we want cybersecurity to be more open, fair, and inclusive, and we’re “learning by doing.” Results from the workshop will inform ongoing research, however participation in the research aspect of the workshop is entirely optional.

No prior experience or knowledge of cybersecurity required! As a feminist organisation, we want to reconfigure the assumption that digital security is for technical experts only. While the workshop is open to all, we particularly welcome women and other groups which are underrepresented in cybersecurity discussions.

This workshop is run in partnership with TIME’S UP UK. TIME’S UP came into being following the revelations about Harvey Weinstein and the widespread disclosures of abuse by powerful men via #MeToo across the entertainment industry. The global movement brought together filmmakers, actors, directors, producers and writers in Hollywood and the UK to campaign for systemic change and the ending of harassment and abuse across the sector. TIME’S UP looks forward to achieving zero tolerance of harassment, 50/50 pay parity and equal representation across the leadership of film, television and theatre sectors bringing about sustainable cultural change. https://www.timesupuk.org/

This workshop is organised by researchers at the Oxford Internet Institute, in collaboration with Darktrace, a cyber defence company. It is funded by a UK Research and Innovation “Citizen Science” research grant (BBSRC Grant reference number BB/T018593/1).

There’s a Climate Crisis raging around us and all that anyone seems to want to do is talk, now it’s time for action.

We’ve formed this group for everyone who is passionate about human and environmental problems and wants to collaborate to create impactful solutions.

We’ve adopted some simple techniques from the startup world and combined them with some theories on collaborative working to create a simple process for producing impactful solutions we can actually enact.

We hope from this group we’ll invent new products, start exciting projects, come up with interesting campaigns, launch innovative charities and have fun doing it.

Don’t worry! Taking part requires no specific knowledge of anything. Everything is tailored for simplicity to ensure a diverse group can come to the meeting with basically no training and leave with a Climate Crisis solution to collaborate on.

These monthly events will occur in various locations around London, please share this event with anyone else you think would like to attend. You should also sign up on our website for more information: https://cvcollective.mailchimpsites.com

Livingmaps Network was established in 2013 to develop a network of researchers, community activists, artists and others with a common interest in the use of mapping for social change, public engagement, critical debate, and creative forms of community campaigning. It now has nearly 2000 names on its subscription list, people who have attended one or more of our events over the past few years, and/or who follow our online journal. We are keen to involve more people in our activities, and to facilitate new projects and events proposed by members of our network.

Join Julie Futcher and other members of the Blue-Sky team to hear about their crowdsourcing project – generating a map of London’s Sky to document and share city-wide feelings of improved wellbeing, to better understand how a view of sky influences our lives and happiness.

Find out more about a planned exhibition and participatory mapping event at Tate Exchange (4th -5th April) where there will be opportunities to discuss your experiences with like-minded souls, put your happiness on the map and do some sky bathing. Together we will be exploring how a view of sky can generate momentary value, towards happiness, health and wellbeing. Take a photo of the sky on your phone, bring it along, and put it on the Tate Map!

The #BlueSkyHappiness project is a collaboration between London Citizens, Flourishing Lives, Inner London Ramblers, Living Maps, London National Park City, Urban Generation and Tranquil Cities.

Tickets are £5.00 to cover the cost of refreshments: Register

A gender-inclusive chat about women’s past & future in cultural & tech industries, for International Women’s Day.

We will all sit around an art table, to amuse ourselves and attending children.

The Technoprogressive New Deal (TND) builds on various ideas known as “Green New Deals” by additionally emphasising the possibility and desirability of greater liberation from the constraints of what is known as “human nature”. In this way, the TND draws on insights from the worldwide transhumanist and technoprogressive communities about the radical potential of emerging technologies.

The TND is a work in progress. This event, which is jointly organised by London Futurists and the Transhumanist Party (UK), is a chance to shape and improve this initiative, at a time when most political discussion is being blindsided by the accelerating pace of technological innovation.

In this event, David Wood, Chair of London Futurists, will review and raise questions about eight overlapping angles of the TND:

  • A technoprogressive social contract: How should society be structured for a world in which many fewer people earn money by working? What preparations are needed as we move towards a “post work society”?
  • A technoprogressive scorecard: What metrics should be put in place as a replacement for the GDP index as the guiding light for evaluating the success of the economy?
  • The technoprogressive dividend: How will investments in measures to address inherited flaws in human nature (body, mind, spirit, and social relations) have strong and equitable economic benefits as well as strong and equitable humanitarian benefits?
  • A technoprogressive regulatory framework: How should Big Tech be constrained and regulated? And what regulations should govern individual freedom of choice regarding new drugs, therapies, and treatments?
  • Technoprogressive approaches to environmental crises: Green technologies offer considerable promise to address environmental risks. However, major questions remain.
  • Technoprogressive approaches to international conflict: As technology raises worrying new possibilities for warfare and terrorism, how can technology be used in parallel to help establish greater peace and safety?
  • Technoprogressive fundamentals: How should decisions be made, regarding which parts of human nature should be cherished and protected at all costs, which should be enhanced, and which should be overcome (transcended)?
  • Building a technoprogressive alliance: Changing the world involves alliances as well as ideals. It involves compromises as well as principles. Which alliances and partnerships should the technoprogressive movement cultivate?

For each area, there will be opportunity for audience Q&A and group discussion.

David Wood is the author or lead editor of nine books, including, most recently, “RAFT 2035: Roadmap to Abundance, Flourishing, and Transcendence, by 2035”, from which many of the ideas in this talk have been developed. For more details, see https://deltawisdom.com/books

For information about London Futurists, see https://londonfuturists.com

For information about the Transhumanist Party (UK) see https://www.transhumanistparty.org.uk

Please arrive in time to be seated for the start of the presentation at 6.30pm.

The meeting is free to attend, but numbers will be restricted, so please register.

No refreshments will be provided, but attendees are welcome to bring their own.

Effective altruism is about answering one simple question: how can we use our resources to help others the most?

Rather than just doing what feels right, we use evidence and careful analysis to find the very best causes to work on.

Come along and discuss whatever you feel like. If you’re new to effective altruism, you are very welcome too.

Please bring some vegan food to share.

Svelte is a radical new approach to building user interfaces. Whereas traditional frameworks like React and Vue do the bulk of their work in the browser, Svelte shifts that work into a compile step that happens when you build your app. Instead of using techniques like virtual DOM diffing, Svelte writes code that surgically updates the DOM when the state of your app changes. Read the introductory blogpost to learn more.

Join fellow Svelte enthusiasts for an evening of lightning talks and chatter.

  • Svelte at Bloomberg - Julian Burgess (@aubergene)
  • The Svelte Context API - Antony (@antony)
  • Using Svelte in React 🤷 - Kevin Wenner (@kevinwenner)
  • Svelte-Utils, a quick intro - Joe Reeve (isnit0)
  • Your project…

There are currently spots available for lightning talks: if you have a project, or have seen a tool/library/project you want to tell the community about, message or comment to give a <5min talk (need not be your own thing).

Looking forward to seeing you there!

Every month we meet up to collaborate on projects, to discuss progress and to learn together. This is a meetup for engineers of all stripes (hackers, makers, designers and other technologists) who wish to contribute their spare time and talents to radical projects, or work on their own projects. The evening will kickoff with a short introduction round, after which you can proceed to work on your own project, join someone else’s or join one of ours.

What is a radical project? Here at Radical Engineers, we have been seeking and contacting organisations which aim to fundamentally change our economic, political and social systems to enhance human autonomy and social equality. We discuss their projects and clarify any technical challenges or needs they may have so that when they are presented to you, our community, you know that they are properly considered and genuinely useful. Our vetting process means that you will only be working on projects which will help not just to fix the symptoms of our economic systems, but aim to contribute to systemic change itself.

Not an engineer? That’s ok too! You would be surprised at the variety of skills needed for projects. Spreadsheet sprites, word wizards and pixel pirates are valued guests and we could always use a hand scoping out new projects!

See some projects Radical Engineers are working on at www.radicalengineers.com

This will be the first of a series of activist meetups/chats around the country. They’ll be opportunities for a relaxed, open and activist-led discussion (as opposed to a panel event) on where LPV and Labour pro-Europeanism more generally could go next.

Please note - you will need to bring a laptop to this event

It has only been two months since the election defeat and the upcoming local elections are more important than ever if we want to prevent the consolidation of that Conservative victory across the country.

We made astonishing headway in the 2019 General Election, building and thoroughly testing the GOTV Dashboard, our Twitter tool and the powerful insight viewer.

With only 9 weeks to go from the hack day to the election we need to work fast, build on our existing toolsets and tackle the problems presented to us by the campaigners at our Campaigner Confession event on February 12.

All technologists, activists, organisers and campaigners, are welcome!

Including new people who are interested in evidence based campaign innovation and want to work out what happened and why.

What is Campaign Lab?

Campaign Lab is a community of politically-minded progressive data scientists, researchers and activists who are working together to build new election tools and change the way we analyse and understand political election campaigning.

You will need to bring a laptop to this event

Everyone welcome!

The London meetup for civic and political technology.

Speakers this month are along the theme of political parties and coalitions, and the tools that parties organise on.

  • James Clarke, Deputy Leader of Renew UK a new political party
  • Tabitha Morton, CEO of MoreUnited a coalition of MPs across the spectrum brought together by shared aims
  • Flore Blondel-Goupil, Business Development Director EMEA at Nationbuilder, these are a suite of tools that have helped revolutionise campaigning.
  • James Smith, Leader of Something New, a new startup political party.

Schedule

  • 7.00pm – Doors Open
  • 7.30pm – Welcome and intro
  • 7.40pm – Speakers
  • 9.00pm – Drinks

Join us in celebrating the launch of Means TV, the world’s first worker-owned, post-capitalist streaming service in London on 2.27.2020!

We’re kicking off the world premiere of Means TV with an evening of entertainment for the 99% with comrades, drinks, and a screening of one of our flagship films, Gaza Fights For Freedom.

Tickets are £15. All proceeds go back into making worker-owned entertainment.

Together, we can build media that empowers and reflects the working class!

About Gaza Fights For Freedom

A riveting documentary on Gaza’s Great March of Return by Abby Martin and a heroic team of Palestinian videographers.

This collaboration shows you Gaza’s protest movement like you’ve never seen before. Filmed during the height of the Great March Of Return protests, it features exclusive footage of demonstrations where 200 unarmed civilians have been killed by Israeli snipers since March 30, 2018.

Watch the trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fru3tsO6dzE

About Means TV

Launching on 2.26.2020, Means TV will have a library of documentaries, movies, and shows with new programming added all the time. We’ll also have live weekly shows covering news, culture, gaming and sports.

All of this will be available to subscribers for $10/month across desktop, mobile and smart TV devices like Roku, Fire TV and Apple TV.

No advertisements or product placements. No corporate backers or VC cash ever.

We’re entirely funded by people like you.

Together, let’s build a long-standing, worker-owned media infrastructure that reflects and empowers the 99%.

Means TV is for all of us: https://means.tv

Our next data science ethics bookclub is on recommender systems. You are welcome to pick from this reading list, depending on your interest and the time you have:

Articles

Academic journal articles

Quick reads

Tutorial

FAQs

Why are we doing this?

There’s a lot of good writing out there and one of the most important principles (even in our own ethical principles) is to discuss and debate the ethical questions.

We hope this will help people gain the tools they need to think about this in their jobs or in DataKind projects, or in encountering algorithmic tools in their everyday life. But if all you get out of it is some friendly discussion over a coffee or beer, that works too :-)

Do I need to be a data scientist to participate?

Nope. We’ll have a mix of technical and non-technical reading material. The aim is to think about data science in a context of ethical impacts and consequences - and that affects everybody!

Is there an online option?

We will be hosting an online group alongisde the in-person event - if you’d like to join remotely, please select the ‘remote bookclub’ option from the ticket options. We’ll also be live tweeting using the hashtag #DKbookclub and taking comments/questions.

I have a brilliant idea for reading material/a theme! Who do I tell?

We love suggestions! Tell us at [email protected]

We welcome you to the very first community dinner at Newspeak House specifically for female-identifying and non-binary people.

A casual dinner to meet new friends and bring people together in the politics and technology sectors. No matter your job title or your experience in these industries, we welcome all diversities of thought.

Vegan food will be provided. Donations are welcome. For specific dietary requirements, email [email protected]

What if I identify as male but I want to come and support?

You can support by sharing this event link with your female-identifying and non-binary friends, encouraging them to come along. But you are not welcome to attend this event.

What if I don’t identify with any gender identity labels?

If you feel you need a safe space to connect with others and express yourself, and currently feel you can’t do that in other social spaces, then this event is a good place to start. You are welcome to join us.

Data privacy is an important and often an overlooked subject in technology. With the rise of devices such as Amazon Ring, the Cambridge Analytica scandal and facial recognition software being rolled out by the Metropolitan police, it is more relevant than ever.

There will be lightning talks (speakers TBC) and then plenty of time to discuss the topics raised and meet fellow attendees. If you would like to give a lightning talk, please get in touch.

Optional Reading:

Brought to you by Subversion.

PaperJam Game Jam is like a book club, but instead of a book we play a videogame, and as well as discussing it, we make paper prototypes inspired by it!

This time, we’re looking at Factorio, an extraordinary game about escaping an alien planet by building a rocket from scratch.

All are welcome, but some basic familiarity with boardgames or game design will be helpful. It generally goes like this:

  • Arrive at the event having played Factorio. There’s a free demo available, but I encourage you to buy it! If you don’t find time to play, don’t let that stop you from coming.
  • We discuss the game: Why is it fun? What are the systems in it and how do they work? etc
  • We eat dinner together: there are a dozen places on the street that do takeaway of various cuisines.
  • We try and make paper prototypes inspired by the game. A selection of materials are provided, but feel free to bring your own.
  • We play and discuss each others’ prototypes.

The Conservative party has won a huge majority. ToryTechs want to use technology to help make the most of this.

How can we…

  • help new MPs get their offices setup?
  • engage people in what the government is doing?
  • help the party and MPs be more effective?

Join other Tory Technologists and designers at the first ever ToryTechs Hackathon!

We’ll be spending Saturday and Sunday the 15 & 16th building, testing, and launching tech to improve democracy, and the effectiveness of government.

A hackathon is a weekend event for technologists, designers, and domain experts to come together and solve problems in an intensive and collaborative way. Read more here: https://hackathon.guide

Anyone can come (even if you’re not a member of the Conservative Party), we welcome your interest and would appreciate different perspectives. Everyone is welcome, as long as they follow our code-of-conduct.

Beginners are welcome too! Attendees have a huge range of skill-sets, so you’ll have no problem finding someone to learn from.

Join Campaign Lab to see how we can help out in the upcoming local elections! The fightback begins now!

Local elections and mayoral elections will be happening this May across the UK. Some of these elections will be taking place in areas where Labour has lost MPs so the fightback locally begins now!

Join Campaign Lab for our event where we’ll be inviting campaign organisers and activists from across the country to share their local campaign challenges and what technical help they may need. We’re just confirming on our three fantastic speakers for our event - more details to follow!

During the panel and breakout session we’ll explore how the speakers are currently running their campaigns, their current practices in an effort to identify where there is space for innovation and improvement - asking our candidates and activists: how can the Campaign Lab community help their campaigns on the ground?

Campaign Lab is a community of activists, researchers and technologists working towards a more evidence-based approach to campaigning - outside of this event series we run monthly hackdays and meetups, come join us.

From facial recognition to social media monitoring, from remote hacking to the use of mobile surveillance equipment called ‘IMSI catchers’, UK police forces are using an ever-expanding array of surveillance tools to spy on us as we go about our everyday lives. Too often, these new and intrusive spying technologies are rolled out without the say, or even the knowledge, of the public or their locally elected representatives.

The use of police surveillance technologies can threaten our privacy and may cause us to change who we associate with and what we feel we can do and say. These technologies can also be used to target, profile and discriminate against certain communities - including minority, low-income and politically active communities.

Join us in London to hear about Privacy International & Liberty’s campaign for the public to have a greater say as to whether their local police force should be allowed to use such highly intrusive technologies.

Speaker: Privacy International Legal Officer Camilla Graham Wood @milliegw

Further reading: https://privacyinternational.org/campaigns/neighbourhood-watched

We are organizing an event for Wikimedians and researchers to exchange! Come along and learn more about research happening around Wikimedia and what Wikimedians can teach you about the different Wikimedia projects!

A large part of the computer science research community is exploring Wikipedia, Wikidata and their sister projects. In the fields of natural language processing (NLP) as well as semantic web, Wikipedia and Wikidata are often used as a fundamental part of the research world. At the same time, the community of Wikidata and Wikipedia could make use of a variety of tools developed by researchers. However, currently, the gap between things explored in research and actual applications in Wikidata and Wikipedia needs bridging. Therefore, we want to build a community of Wikidata community members and research to exchange needs, existing tools, open challenges and research question to foster an environment, where both communities can benefit from the exchange.

The ideal is to have all the different approaches and commonalities under one umbrella to foster exchange and support of different research communities and their approaches.

OpenSym and the WikiWorkshop are already doing that for the people submitting to and attending computer science research conferences. But without the exchange with the community, there is a lack of communication, creating silos of missing exchange.

The Goal is to connect the researcher and the Wikimedia community to enable an exchange that could ultimately lead to the research projects being implemented as tools for Wikipedia. And vice-versa: More research projects build on community needs.

We invite researchers, Wikimedians, anyone who does or is planning to do research on or around Wikimedia projects, such as Wikipedia, Wikidata and others, anyone in the community, who is interested in improving the research happening around Wikimedia - you don’t need any experience in research. Wikipedia editor, Wikidata data magician, whatever you do in Wikimedia projects, your feedback will be highly valuable.

We would ask all researchers to bring an A2/A3 poster about what they are doing in Wikimedia that we can put up so that we can create an easy way to exchange on different projects. If you don’t have a project yet, don’t worry- just bring a poster with topics you find interesting, and you might be able to meet other researchers already working in your field of interest. (If you struggle with printing the poster beforehand, please reach out to us a few days in advance.)

We will spend a day exchanging on recent challenges around Wikimedia. Besides the posters, we aim to form working groups for the afternoon to work on topics of shared interest and possibly propose a project of common interest.

In our commitment to identifying the gaps in how we think about and work with data in the department, we have agreed to focus on four main problem spaces;

I am holding a cross-functional, (directed) unconference [I realise this is an oxymoron but stick with me] to explore these problem spaces and come up with desirable, feasible and viable actions we can take away and present to our Deputy Directors (Helen, Martyn, Jon and Danielle) particularly around the emergent themes of stakeholders mapping, central knowledge management and education, and access to data.

This session will be very much about actually doing stuff; agreeing positive, tangible actions we can take to improve the use of data, to demystify it for our colleagues and to work across the Policy, Data, Product and Tech Arc communities to drive a collaborative, user centred approach to how we work. We would welcome attendance and input from anyone in the MoJ who has an interest in contributing to this, and who wants to share and learn.

More information about the DCWG here. Please read our draft Terms of Reference and draft Justice Services Data Principles as they will inform the discussion. I’d also welcome people’s opinions on the Digital Ethics Charter.

Every month we meet up to collaborate on projects, to discuss progress and to learn together. This is a meetup for engineers of all stripes (hackers, makers, designers and other technologists) who wish to contribute their spare time and talents to radical projects, or work on their own projects. The evening will kickoff with a short introduction round, after which you can proceed to work on your own project, join someone else’s or join one of ours.

What is a radical project? Here at Radical Engineers, we have been seeking and contacting organisations which aim to fundamentally change our economic, political and social systems to enhance human autonomy and social equality. We discuss their projects and clarify any technical challenges or needs they may have so that when they are presented to you, our community, you know that they are properly considered and genuinely useful. Our vetting process means that you will only be working on projects which will help not just to fix the symptoms of our economic systems, but aim to contribute to systemic change itself.

Not an engineer? That’s ok too! You would be surprised at the variety of skills needed for projects. Spreadsheet sprites, word wizards and pixel pirates are valued guests and we could always use a hand scoping out new projects!

See some projects Radical Engineers are working on at www.radicalengineers.com

Intelligence Rising is a role playing game about the future of AI and its consequences for society. You will be playing as heads of states and leaders of big tech companies, and your decisions will determine the future of the world.

The goal of this game is to:

  1. Train AI developers and AI policy professionals to reflect on and prepare for future social and ethical challenges related to AI.
  2. Explore possible futures involving AI technology development, deployment, social impacts, and governance.

More info: https://arxiv.org/pdf/1912.08964.pdf

Intelligence Rising is still under development. This event is one of several play test events we expect to perform this year.

As a play tester, you are expected to:

  1. Select your character ahead of the game and read up a bit on the person you are playing
  2. Participate in a game and debriefing
  3. Fill out a feedback form

The game is also lots of fun and you will be given lunch.

If you want to participate in this game, please contact me directly via email: [email protected]

If you want to participate in future games, fill in this interest form https://sites.google.com/view/intelligence-rising/ and/or join our player google group https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/intelligence-rising-players, to stay informed.

A reading group focusing on systems management, where an organisation or group is considered as one or more living systems and this perspective is used to assess how such a system could be structured to function at the highest level possible. This could consider multiple facets of the system, including the individuals working in the system, physical environment, virtual spaces used, tools available, media used for communication, how teams are structured and how information travels, is processed and stored (and more)!

The general intention is that by developing our ability to understand systems we’ll be better equipped to improve (or at least assess) the organisations or groups we work in or with, whether not-for-profit, corporate, or government.

We meet roughly monthly on a weekday evening to eat and discuss that month’s book, including its ideas and any practical applications (the day of the week varies). There is no set reading list - the next book is generally chosen at the meeting. Past books include Thinking in Systems (Meadows) and Doing the Impossible (Slotkin).

This month we are reading Superforecasting: The Art and Science of Prediction by Philip E. Tetlock and Dan Gardner.

Last decade will be condemned as a total failure of humanity to work together. Next decade and climate change crisis brings challenges that can only be solved by working together.

Join us on a journey of discovery of games that can skill up our ability to collaborate, from passing weapons, providing covering fire in a firefight, healing or boosting a teammate over obstacles.

Speakers

  • Eva Pascoe (Cybersalon.org) – a peak into history of collaborative video gaming
  • Ben Greenway – emotional exploration on how to cooperate with total strangers and without language in Journey and Sky: Children of the Light (by ThatGameCompany).
  • Karo Janicka – how to leverage community to improve village life in Stardew Valley (by Concerned Ape)
  • Simon Sarginson – surviving galactic wars by teaming up with aliens in Startopia (by Mucky Foot)
  • Douglas Rushkoff – author of Cyberia book (1994) and lead of Team Human podcast on collaboration for survival of the species

The Echo Chamber Club brings together various experts and specialists who want to improve information environments. You could be an academic, a journalist, a think-tanker, a technologist or a policy-maker who works on anything related to this field. This could be - disinformation, misinformation, information warfare, truth-making, conspiracy theories, data privacy, data politics, political advertising, microtargeting, transparency, mediatisation, normalisation, echo chambers, filter bubbles, herd thinking and more.

The purpose of this meet up is to meet people who are working in adjacent fields to enable collaboration. However, we also have some exciting provocations lined up to help stimulate conversation.

Every meet up has provocations designed to get the attendees to think about the problems they are facing in different ways. This meet up with have three provocateurs:

Alain de Botton is a writer of essayistic books that have been described as a ‘philosophy of everyday life.’ He’s written on love, travel, architecture and literature. His books have been bestsellers in 30 countries. Alain also started and helps to run a school in London called The School of Life, dedicated to a new vision of education. His latest book, published in September 2019, is a collection of essays written for The School of Life, titled The School of Life: An Emotional Education.

Frederike Kaltheuner is a writer and technology critic and a 2019-2020 Mozilla Tech Policy Fellow. Before joining Mozilla, Frederike was a director at Privacy International in London, where she led the organisation’s strategic work on corporate surveillance and emerging technology. Frederike has given expert evidence in the European Parliament, the Belgium Parliament, and the UK House of Lords. She holds an MSc in Internet Science the University of Oxford and a BA in Philosophy and Politics from Maastricht University.

Areeq Chowdhury is the founder of the think tank WebRoots Democracy which explores the intersection of technology and democratic participation. He’s also Head of Think Tank at Future Advocacy focusing on the social, economic, and political impact of artificial intelligence and emerging technologies.

The meet up will be hosted by Alice Thwaite, founder of the Echo Chamber Club. We will provide snacks and drinks. Please do give us a donation to help us buy the goods.

  • Arrivals from 6.30 pm
  • Provocations from 7pm
  • The event ends when the last person exits

Join us to talk all things political and civic technology - anything from promise trackers, to new ways of campaigning or government. We’re here for it.

We’re starting off the year with 3 brilliant speakers:

  • Dan Barrett, Head of Data Science, Citizens Advice
  • Alex Parsons, Research Associate, mySociety
  • Tabitha Morton, CEO, MoreUnited [TBC]
  • We’ll also be joined by some of the Newspeak House fellows who will share some of the new tools they’re developing for future civic tech endeavours.

  • 7.00pm – Doors Open
  • 7.30pm – Welcome and intro
  • 7.40pm – Speakers
  • 8.30pm – Drinks

A all-day event bringing public servants together with experts to teach, connect and inspire action on the climate emergency

OneGreenGov is the next global event in One Team Gov’s calendar, focused on the environment, sustainability and climate change.

The global environmental problems we are facing are becoming ever more apparent, and are higher in the public consciousness than ever before. As public servants, our work will be touched by climate change and environmental sustainability whether it is part of our day jobs or not.

The OneTeamGov community wants to bring people together to talk, learn and be inspired to take action - to live and work in more sustainable ways, to share their knowledge, and to develop policies, systems and practices which contribute to tackling the climate crisis, resource sustainability and environmental degradation.

To help contribute to this agenda, we are organising events in the UK and convening events worldwide to do this on 22nd January 2020. The events will have different flavours depending on where in the world they’re organised.

The event in London will be held at Newspeak House, hosted by the London College of Political Technologists. Our ambition is for this event is for participants to:

  • Learn something new to help you contribute to the fight against climate change;
  • Meet people interested in taking action for the environment, sustainability, and climate change;
  • Be inspired to take action.

The event will be part-unconference, and part-scheduled speakers and pre-arranged sessions. If you would like to run a session, please submit this form.

Our lives are dominated by an economic system that fuels inequality, makes our jobs and homes more insecure, and hastens environmental breakdown. Support for this system is crumbling, which places us at a moment of both great danger and opportunity. Disaffection with political and economic institutions has unleashed the forces of the populist right, but also created a once-in-a-generation chance to define and build a new economy.

Some people are building this new economy right now in the places they live and work. From workers’ cooperatives to community-owned energy they are shifting wealth and power to people and their communities. But while our zombie economic system stumbles on, all that energy will continue to be blocked by an outdated set of economic rules and institutions.

For more than three decades, the New Economics Foundation’s mission has been to transform the economy so it works for people and the planet. We celebrate – and help to enable – the new economy springing up from below, but we also know that it needs support from above, including a state that prioritises people’s wellbeing and a healthy planet over a misplaced faith in free markets and competition. Therefore we work with people igniting change from below and we combine this with rigorous research to fight for change at the top.

Join us to hear from an exciting panel of speakers to discuss what next for the new economy movement:

December saw the election of a government without a plan to tackle climate breakdown or fix an economy that has failed so many. Exciting and transformative ideas were put forward during this election but failed to cut through. This agenda remains our best chance to tackle the seismic issues we face, yet people have lost the will to believe change is possible. How can we learn from mistakes, and build on the strength of our ideas to continue making the case for a better future?

After discussion there will be drinks and a social.

It may not make the headlines, but Brexit’s impact on UK life online will be a gamechanger. Join us for a night with Open Rights Group to discuss how leaving the European Union will affect how UK residents experience the Internet.

  • Open Rights Group Policy Director Javier Ruiz: Javier will explain how post-Brexit international trade deals with the United States and other countries could impact UK rights online. Trade agreements increasingly include clauses to promote digital trade, which unfortunately tend to translate into weakening the protection of the personal data of ordinary people and increasing the protections on the algorithms and trade secrets of businesses. Entering these agreements will put the UK in a difficult position as it strives to maintain the current arrangements for data flows with the EU.
  • Open Rights Group Campaigns Manager Mike Morel: Mike will provide an overview of EU laws and institutions that currently influence UK rights to free speech online and digital privacy. Find out which protections will disappear, which will remain, and what could happen in a no-deal scenario.

News is broken.

The current system of monetisation (advertising) dis-incentivises good quality journalism in favour of clickbait and sensationalism.

News organisations have historically existed to solve distribution (printing presses) and monetisation/marketing (town criers) problems, these are problems the internet has solved in a much more scalable way.

It’s time Journalism, and by extension society, got a new model - one that uses technology to make high quality journalism sustainable again.

The first HackThePress Hackathon in September 2019 was a huge success, you can read more about it here: https://hackthepress.org/write-up-hackthepress-hackathon/

For the second HTP Hackathon we’ll be back at Newspeak House on Jan 18-19th. The core themes we’ll be exploring are:

  • Monetisation - How can news organisations monetise differently?
  • Public Advice - How can news orgs help people make better decisions?
  • Follow-through - How can news pieces inspire real change?

We will have a judging panel of 4 people from the tech and news industry who will select a winner in each of the three themes above.

For more information, see https://hackthepress.org/2020-hackathon-jan/

Slack workspace: https://bit.ly/HTPSlack

This event is for charity campaigners to discuss best practice and challenges in campaigning for change. We meet quarterly for discussions and to hear from expert speakers. New members are always welcome.

Speakers:

  • Steve Pound, Labour MP for Ealing North from 1997-2019, will be answering a Q&A on what it is really like being an MP and how charities can be better at working with them.
  • Mary Milne, Head of Comms and Campaigns from Traidcraft Exchange will be speaking about their Injustice Advent Calendar which brought together actions from a number of organisations throughout December.

This event is designed for everyone in and around London who is interested in building and growing great businesses through platform strategy and platform design.

70% of value created by tech companies in the past 30 years has come through businesses with network effects, based on market cap data. Network effects are the ultimate growth hack! On the other hand, launching or managing a platform business is extremely difficult and it can have dangerous side effects.

  • How do we improve our success ratio for launching new platforms in the London tech ecosystem?
  • How do we build, manage and create platforms that truly deliver value to all players involved?
  • What role do platforms play in today strategy making? How does it differ in start-ups vs enterprises?
  • How do pipeline products gain Network Effects?
  • How do platform businesses evolve?

These and more are the theme we can discuss together. To start our first session there will be two short (15 min) presentations:

  • Manfredi Sassoli introducing the group and providing context for the relevance of the field.
  • Simone Cicero, ideator of the PDT (Platform Design Toolkit) and worldwide renowned thought leader on platform design and strategy.

Food will be provided.

Please note - you will need to bring a laptop to this event

We really hoped we’d be holding this under happier circumstances but right now a genuinely neutral evidence-based analysis of the election results is urgently needed. In many ways this speaks to the heart of why Campaign Lab was set up.

So join us for our election campaign retrospective to look at what innovations worked, what maybe didn’t and try to understand some of the factors that contributed to the result.

This event will also be an chance for us to take stock, evaluate what we’ve achieved and think about where we should be heading next.

Finally it will also be a chance to thank our community for all their hard work over the past few months and year.

All technologists, activists, organisers and campaigners, are welcome!

Including new people who are interested in evidence based campaign innovation and want to work out what happened and why.

What is Campaign Lab?

Campaign Lab is a community of politically-minded progressive data scientists, researchers and activists who are working together to build new election tools and change the way we analyse and understand political election campaigning.

Check out the Campaign Lab volunteer teams and project guide

You will need to bring a laptop to this event

Everyone welcome!

Wikimedia UK is the national chapter for the global Wikimedia movement which supports Wikipedia and its sister projects. In January 2020, we are hosting a training workshop for Turkish speakers in basic Wikipedia editing. Currently, all language versions of Wikipedia are blocked in Turkey, and although it is still possible to access the website, it is much harder to edit Wikipedia from Turkey. That is why we are encouraging Turkish speakers in the UK to learn to edit Wikipedia so that we can help to improve content on Wikipedia in Turkish.

The workshop will give a general introduction to the basic skills needed to edit Wikipedia, and we will help you to start creating and updating content on the Turkish Wikipedia in the areas of culture, history and the arts. Whatever your interests, Wikipedia has articles about them and we need your help in improving those articles.

Please bring a laptop to the event which you can use to edit Wikipedia. A laptop with a keyboard is much easier to work on than a tablet. If you do not have one of your own, please let us know and we will provide one for you. Snacks and refreshments will also be provided.

For any other questions, please contact Communications Coordinator John at [email protected] or ask us on Twitter @wikimediauk

Görüşürüz!

Julio Alejandro asks “If politicians, diplomats and bureaucrats are perennially stupid and illiterate in technology, economics, and globalisation, why should they concentrate the monopoly on creation of human-civilization services?”

He will explain his map of the systems, technologies, and startups fighting to provide competition, markets, and choice in centralised, monopolised government industries to build better, cheaper, more affordable, transparent, inclusive, and market regulated services in social welfare; immigration; money creation; legality, criminality, enforcement; nation building; environmentalism; gender-racial-religious equality; and private property protection; Bitnation, Social Evolution, Seasteading, (3D Printed) Distributed Defense, Alcor Cryonics, Aragon DAO, Special Governance Zones, AI Pandora Boxchain, privacy Monero, Ulex OS Legal System, Free Private Cities, Kleros (crowdsourced jury), the Paralelni Polis ecosystem, and more.

Julio Alejandro is a VC investor, former CEO of three Blockchain and Disruptive Technologies consultancies, and has lectured in +70 universities and think tanks worldwide, including Oxford, Cambridge, United Nations, Google, EU Parliament, MIT, LSE, WeWork Headquarters, Amnesty International, and the Bahrain EDB.

The sell out corn-based snack event is back. It’s Wine and Wotsits time.

You say wot?

That’s right, there aren’t enough wotsits in campaigners lives, so a few times a year we co-ordinate people coming together to share some of their successes. It’s a pecha kucha format, which means approx 5 presentations of 20 slides, each lasting 20 seconds. It will be an opportunity to hear from cutting edge speakers doing exciting things. Previous speakers include those from Save the Children, Shelter, WWF, Unlock Democracy, Which?, Change.org, National Autistic Society, Care2, Let Toys be Toys, Transform Justice and many more. If you have something you’d love to talk about, please let us know!

Wot Wot Who?

We’ll be unveiling the full list of speakers over the next few weeks.

How many tickets are there?

About 125. We always sell out, so please grab a ticket early to avoid disappointment, and if you can’t make it let us know so someone else can grab your spot.

How does it work?

You show up with whatever you want to drink (wine, fizz, non-alcoholic, whatever takes your fancy), we provide the wotsits and some cups. Rebels sometimes bring onion rings or monster munch.

You have a great evening, make friends with strangers and learn a bunch.

Livingmaps Network was established in 2013 to develop a network of researchers, community activists, artists and others with a common interest in the use of mapping for social change, public engagement, critical debate, and creative forms of community campaigning. It now has nearly 2000 names on its subscription list, people who have attended one or more of our events over the past few years, and/or who follow our online journal. We are keen to involve more people in our activities, and to facilitate new projects and events proposed by members of our network.

For this purpose we are organising an event in the New Year which will give you an opportunity to meet the directors and advisory group, and to find out more about our plans for the future. Readers of the journal will be able to meet the editors and some of the contributors, and discuss the possibility of writing something for us. It will also be an opportunity to share your own plans with us, to exchange experiences and ideas with other people in the network, all over pizza and drinks.

Programme

  • Welcome and Introduction
  • Screening of The Citizens Atlas of London
  • Living Maps Review Panel Discussion
  • Putting ourselves on the Map: social networking

Tickets are £5.00 to cover the cost of refreshments and room hire: Register

Yes it’s cold and dark and January. But remember when it was cold and dark and there was a general election?

Let’s not forget everything we learned: good or bad. What worked? What absolutely bombed?

Let’s celebrate efforts to register voters, get out the vote and all the other good stuff.

If you liked the ElectionTechHandbook, you’ll love the Election Tech Debrief!

A reading group focusing on systems management, where an organisation or group is considered as one or more living systems and this perspective is used to assess how such a system could be structured to function at the highest level possible. This could consider multiple facets of the system, including the individuals working in the system, physical environment, virtual spaces used, tools available, media used for communication, how teams are structured and how information travels, is processed and stored (and more)!

The general intention is that by developing our ability to understand systems we’ll be better equipped to improve (or at least assess) the organisations or groups we work in or with, whether not-for-profit, corporate, or government.

We meet roughly monthly on a weekday evening to eat and discuss that month’s book, including its ideas and any practical applications (the day of the week varies). There is no set reading list - the next book is generally chosen at the meeting. Past books include Thinking in Systems (Meadows) and Doing the Impossible (Slotkin).

This month we are reading Superforecasting: The Art and Science of Prediction by Philip E. Tetlock and Dan Gardner.

Every other Tuesday we will be meeting up to collaborate on projects, to discuss progress and to learn together. This is a meetup for engineers of all stripes (hackers, makers, designers and other technologists) who wish to contribute their spare time and talents to radical projects, or work on their own projects. The evening will kickoff with a short introduction round, after which you can proceed to work on your own project, join someone else’s or join one of ours.

What is a radical project? Here at Radical Engineers, we have been seeking and contacting organisations which aim to fundamentally change our economic, political and social systems to enhance human autonomy and social equality. We discuss their projects and clarify any technical challenges or needs they may have so that when they are presented to you, our community, you know that they are properly considered and genuinely useful. Our vetting process means that you will only be working on projects which will help not just to fix the symptoms of our economic systems, but aim to contribute to systemic change itself.

Not an engineer? That’s ok too! You would be surprised at the variety of skills needed for projects. Spreadsheet sprites, word wizards and pixel pirates are valued guests and we could always use a hand scoping out new projects!

See some projects Radical Engineers are working on.

Just like in 2017, we will be at Newspeak House to experience the election excitement of adding new MPs to Wikipedia and updating pages related to UK politics subjects.

This is not a training event, so we would expect those who come to be reasonably proficient Wikipedia editors already. There will be lots of updates to do, so come and join us and help improve Wikipedia’s coverage of UK politics.

Dinner, wifi, sofas, desks, drinks & chats: if you’re a fan of electiontechhandbook.uk then this is the place for you!

Every Wednesday night from now until the election, 7:30 till late, show up any time and ring the bell!

Dinner, wifi, sofas, desks, drinks & chats: if you’re a fan of electiontechhandbook.uk then this is the place for you!

Every Wednesday night from now until the election, 7:30 till late, show up any time and ring the bell!

Every other Tuesday we will be meeting up to collaborate on projects, to discuss progress and to learn together. This is a meetup for engineers of all stripes (hackers, makers, designers and other technologists) who wish to contribute their spare time and talents to radical projects, or work on their own projects. The evening will kickoff with a short introduction round, after which you can proceed to work on your own project, join someone else’s or join one of ours.

What is a radical project? Here at Radical Engineers, we have been seeking and contacting organisations which aim to fundamentally change our economic, political and social systems to enhance human autonomy and social equality. We discuss their projects and clarify any technical challenges or needs they may have so that when they are presented to you, our community, you know that they are properly considered and genuinely useful. Our vetting process means that you will only be working on projects which will help not just to fix the symptoms of our economic systems, but aim to contribute to systemic change itself.

Not an engineer? That’s ok too! You would be surprised at the variety of skills needed for projects. Spreadsheet sprites, word wizards and pixel pirates are valued guests and we could always use a hand scoping out new projects!

See some projects Radical Engineers are working on.

Dinner, wifi, sofas, desks, drinks & chats: if you’re a fan of electiontechhandbook.uk then this is the place for you!

Every Wednesday night from now until the election, 7:30 till late, show up any time and ring the bell!

Building technology for the Liberal Democrats. You’ll need a laptop to participate.

Join your fellow HackThePress members at Newspeak House to hang out and continue hacking on news-tech 👩‍💻.

We’ll provide power, WiFi, and somewhere warm, you bring the code! (and beer)

There are a few projects for you to join, or you can come with your own idea to work on.

Dinner, wifi, sofas, desks, drinks & chats: if you’re a fan of electiontechhandbook.uk then this is the place for you!

Every Wednesday night from now until the election, 7:30 till late, show up any time and ring the bell!

Every other Tuesday we will be meeting up to collaborate on projects, to discuss progress and to learn together. This is a meetup for engineers of all stripes (hackers, makers, designers and other technologists) who wish to contribute their spare time and talents to radical projects, or work on their own projects. The evening will kickoff with a short introduction round, after which you can proceed to work on your own project, join someone else’s or join one of ours.

What is a radical project? Here at Radical Engineers, we have been seeking and contacting organisations which aim to fundamentally change our economic, political and social systems to enhance human autonomy and social equality. We discuss their projects and clarify any technical challenges or needs they may have so that when they are presented to you, our community, you know that they are properly considered and genuinely useful. Our vetting process means that you will only be working on projects which will help not just to fix the symptoms of our economic systems, but aim to contribute to systemic change itself.

Not an engineer? That’s ok too! You would be surprised at the variety of skills needed for projects. Spreadsheet sprites, word wizards and pixel pirates are valued guests and we could always use a hand scoping out new projects!

See some projects Radical Engineers are working on.

Building technology for the Liberal Democrats. You’ll need a laptop to participate.

On the 14th of November, local councils will release details of who is standing for the upcoming election. At this event, we’ll be collecting all that data together into one database.

Stay for the whole session or just drop in whenever you can — every little helps! We’ll provide drinks and snacks! You’ll need a laptop, but no technical knowledge.

You might like to sign up for an account at candidates.democracyclub.org.uk before the event.

A reading group focusing on systems management, where an organisation or group is considered as one or more living systems and this perspective is used to assess how such a system could be structured to function at the highest level possible. This could consider multiple facets of the system, including the individuals working in the system, physical environment, virtual spaces used, tools available, media used for communication, how teams are structured and how information travels, is processed and stored (and more)!

The general intention is that by developing our ability to understand systems we’ll be better equipped to improve (or at least assess) the organisations or groups we work in or with, whether not-for-profit, corporate, or government.

We meet roughly monthly on a weekday evening to eat and discuss that month’s book, including its ideas and any practical applications (the day of the week varies). There is no set reading list - the next book is generally chosen at the meeting. Past books include Thinking in Systems (Meadows) and Doing the Impossible (Slotkin).

No text this month - volunteers will give lightning talks, and then we will have a discussion.

Dinner, wifi, sofas, desks, drinks & chats: if you’re a fan of electiontechhandbook.uk then this is the place for you!

Every Wednesday night from now until the election, 7:30 till late, show up any time and ring the bell!

Building technology for the Liberal Democrats. You’ll need a laptop to participate.

Join your fellow HackThePress members at Newspeak House to hang out and continue hacking on news-tech 👩‍💻.

We’ll provide power, WiFi, and somewhere warm, you bring the code! (and beer)

There are a few projects for you to join, or you can come with your own idea to work on.

Dinner, wifi, sofas, desks, drinks & chats: if you’re a fan of electiontechhandbook.uk then this is the place for you!

Every Wednesday night from now until the election, 7:30 till late, show up any time and ring the bell!

Every other Tuesday we will be meeting up to collaborate on projects, to discuss progress and to learn together. This is a meetup for engineers of all stripes (hackers, makers, designers and other technologists) who wish to contribute their spare time and talents to radical projects, or work on their own projects. The evening will kickoff with a short introduction round, after which you can proceed to work on your own project, join someone else’s or join one of ours.

What is a radical project? Here at Radical Engineers, we have been seeking and contacting organisations which aim to fundamentally change our economic, political and social systems to enhance human autonomy and social equality. We discuss their projects and clarify any technical challenges or needs they may have so that when they are presented to you, our community, you know that they are properly considered and genuinely useful. Our vetting process means that you will only be working on projects which will help not just to fix the symptoms of our economic systems, but aim to contribute to systemic change itself.

Not an engineer? That’s ok too! You would be surprised at the variety of skills needed for projects. Spreadsheet sprites, word wizards and pixel pirates are valued guests and we could always use a hand scoping out new projects!

See some projects Radical Engineers are working on.

Digital technology has transformed the way that humans are able to relate to each other. In spite of being able to connect over vast differences, we are more atomised, alienated and culturally estranged than ever. What does this mean for building working-class power? How can we create the cultural infrastructure that we need to be able to organise together and change the World for the better.

Douglas Lain of Zero Books hosts a conversation with some of the most important voices on the British left.

  • Sasha Josette, The World Transformed festival and Momentum organiser.
  • Chris Nineham, Counterfire and Stop the War founder, Zero Books author
  • Tom O’ Brien, Alpha to Omega podcast host
  • Angie Speaks, Youtuber and Left wing commentator
  • Cian Prendiville, Socialist organiser, Bottom Dog podcast host
  • David Swift, Historian and Zero Books Author

It’s Wikidata’s 7th birthday at the end of October. Come and celebrate with drinks at this informal meetup organised by Wikimedia UK.

Meet other Wikidata users and talk about your projects, get help with questions and hang out with other people who share your love of data science!

Come and get the conversation started ahead of the main event. Hosted by Mozilla Fellow Anouk Ruhaak.

Join your fellow HackThePress members at Newspeak House to hang out and continue hacking on news-tech 👩‍💻.

We’ll provide power, WiFi, and somewhere warm, you bring the code! (and beer)

There are a few projects for you to join, or you can come with your own idea to work on.

Every other Tuesday we will be meeting up to collaborate on projects, to discuss progress and to learn together. This is a meetup for engineers of all stripes (hackers, makers, designers and other technologists) who wish to contribute their spare time and talents to radical projects, or work on their own projects. The evening will kickoff with a short introduction round, after which you can proceed to work on your own project, join someone else’s or join one of ours.

What is a radical project? Here at Radical Engineers, we have been seeking and contacting organisations which aim to fundamentally change our economic, political and social systems to enhance human autonomy and social equality. We discuss their projects and clarify any technical challenges or needs they may have so that when they are presented to you, our community, you know that they are properly considered and genuinely useful. Our vetting process means that you will only be working on projects which will help not just to fix the symptoms of our economic systems, but aim to contribute to systemic change itself.

Not an engineer? That’s ok too! You would be surprised at the variety of skills needed for projects. Spreadsheet sprites, word wizards and pixel pirates are valued guests and we could always use a hand scoping out new projects!

See some projects Radical Engineers are working on.

A reading group focusing on systems management, where an organisation or group is considered as one or more living systems and this perspective is used to assess how such a system could be structured to function at the highest level possible. This could consider multiple facets of the system, including the individuals working in the system, physical environment, virtual spaces used, tools available, media used for communication, how teams are structured and how information travels, is processed and stored (and more)!

The general intention is that by developing our ability to understand systems we’ll be better equipped to improve (or at least assess) the organisations or groups we work in or with, whether not-for-profit, corporate, or government.

This month we are reading two papers:

Useful Theory of Change Models: Although frequently discussed in the evaluation literature and general agreement on what a theory of change is conceptually, there is actually little agreement beyond the big picture of just what a theory of change comprises, what does it show, how it can be represented and how it can be used. This article outlines models for theories of change and their development that have proven quite useful for both straightforward and more complex interventions. The models are intuitive, flexible, well-defined in terms of their components and link directly to rigorous models of causality. The models provide a structured framework for developing a theory of change and analysing the intervention it represents.

The COM-B Theory of Change Model (V3): Discussion of the COM-B (‘capability’, ‘opportunity’, ‘motivation’ and ‘behaviour’) model for making interventions to cause behaviour change.

We meet roughly monthly on a weekday evening to eat and discuss that month’s book, including its ideas and any practical applications (the day of the week varies). There is no set reading list - the next book is generally chosen at the meeting. Past books include Thinking in Systems (Meadows) and Doing the Impossible (Slotkin).

Join your fellow HackThePress members at Newspeak House to hang out and continue hacking on news-tech 👩‍💻.

We’ll provide power, WiFi, and somewhere warm, you bring the code! (and beer)

There are a few projects for you to join, or you can come with your own idea to work on.

The sell out corn-based snack event is back. It’s Wine and Wotsits time.

You say wot?

That’s right, there aren’t enough wotsits in campaigners lives, so a few times a year we co-ordinate people coming together to share some of their successes. It’s a pecha kucha format, which means approx 5 presentations of 20 slides, each lasting 20 seconds. It will be an opportunity to hear from cutting edge speakers doing exciting things. Previous speakers include those from Save the Children, Shelter, WWF, Unlock Democracy, Which?, Change.org, National Autistic Society, Care2, Let Toys be Toys, Transform Justice and many more. If you have something you’d love to talk about, please let us know!

Wot Wot Who?

Top notch speakers. Wot else?

  • Tamsin Omond on Extinction Rebellion and how they are shaking up campaigning
  • Pete Moorey on what campaigners can learn from the Marvel Comic Universe
  • Joe Mitchell on Democracy Club’s fantastic election tools

.. more to come

How many tickets are there?

A limited number, we generally have a waitlist, so sign up early. We try and fit in as many people as we can.

How does it work?

You show up with whatever you want to drink (wine, fizz, non-alcoholic, whatever takes your fancy), we provide the wotsits and some cups. You have a great evening. It’s deliberately timed to allow people to come straight from work.

Wot you waiting for? (as Gwen Stefani would say) #wineandwotsits

The Echo Chamber Club invites you to a meet up and discussion on: “what makes a healthy information environment?”

There are many subjects being examined by academics, journalists, think-tanks, technologists and policy makers when it comes to digital’s impact on democracy. Disinformation, misinformation, information warfare, truth-making, conspiracy theories, data privacy, data politics, political advertising, microtargeting, transparency, mediatisation, normalisation, echo chambers, filter bubbles, herd thinking and more.

Democracy is a contested term. We agree that it means: “rule by the people”. But we also acknowledge that in a modern nation state the people need to elect representatives to govern them. Information then must circulate between citizens and the government in order to ensure that ‘the people have the power’. But what are the best mechanisms for this? What are the institutions that we absolutely need? Are there any red lines?

We often talk about various digital structures ‘undermining democracy’. But if we cannot agree what democracy is, then how do we agree that it is being undermined? How can we then look to how to use digital to promote democratic ideals?

The purpose of this meetup is to meet people who are working in adjacent fields to enable collaboration. However, we also have some exciting provocations lined up to help stimulate conversation:

  • Matthew d’Ancona - partner at Tortoise Media and columnist for GQ, the Evening Standard and the Guardian. Matt has decades of experience commentating on politics and has written many books including: “Post-Truth: The New War on Truth and How to Fight Back”.
  • Nafisa Bakkar - founder and CEO of Amaliah and CEO of Halal Gems. Amaliah is dedicated to representing Muslim women. It has a reach of 3.2 million across all editorial channels and publishes on topics from lifestyle to relationships to fashion and politics.
  • Gemma Milne - tech and science journalist and co-founder of Science: Disrupt. Gemma has written for many publications including Forbes, the Guardian and the BBC. Her latest book focusses on hype and is called: “Smoke and Mirrors”. It is out next year and helps form a realistic understanding of what is going on in tech and science today.

Please register to ensure your place.

Every other Tuesday we will be meeting up to collaborate on projects, to discuss progress and to learn together. This is a meetup for engineers of all stripes (hackers, makers, designers and other technologists) who wish to contribute their spare time and talents to radical projects, or work on their own projects. The evening will kickoff with a short introduction round, after which you can proceed to work on your own project, join someone else’s or join one of ours.

What is a radical project? Here at Radical Engineers, we have been seeking and contacting organisations which aim to fundamentally change our economic, political and social systems to enhance human autonomy and social equality. We discuss their projects and clarify any technical challenges or needs they may have so that when they are presented to you, our community, you know that they are properly considered and genuinely useful. Our vetting process means that you will only be working on projects which will help not just to fix the symptoms of our economic systems, but aim to contribute to systemic change itself.

Not an engineer? That’s ok too! You would be surprised at the variety of skills needed for projects. Spreadsheet sprites, word wizards and pixel pirates are valued guests and we could always use a hand scoping out new projects!

See some projects Radical Engineers are working on.

For those who can’t choose sides between Greta Thunberg and the Suffragettes… or between ecology and feminism…

We are a bit lost… somewhere between the #metoo movement and the rise of Extinction Rebellion. Feeling stretched between fighting for women’s rights and the earth… so we want to create a space to connect with, explore the tensions between and raise questions about ecology and feminism. Are they compatible? How can feminist action be mindful of climate change activism and the other way around? How can we join forces to make a difference?

Using dialogue, drama and dance, we will explore your own lived experiences and questions around the climate crisis and the feminist cause. Through this creative process, we will together define the themes that are most alive in us as Londoners, and be the key points in coming meetings.

Please note - you will need to bring a laptop to this event

It’s General Election Time! Join Campaign Lab for a Hack Day working on political data science challenges and designing, developing and testing election tech and campaigning innovations.

From data analysis to improve targeting and working out the factors that could swing an election to developing new election tools for activists on the ground, we’ll be working out how together we can make the biggest impact on this election.

What is Campaign Lab?

Campaign Lab is a community of politically-minded progressive data scientists, researchers and activists who are working together to build new election tools and change the way we analyse and understand political election campaigning.

Check out the Campaign Lab volunteer teams and project guide

You will need to bring a laptop to this event

Everyone welcome!

We are a group of philosophy researchers and students from the University of Bristol. We acknowledge that in our increasingly busy lives, the time people spend to inform themselves is extremely narrow. On top of that, behind all media – newspapers, advertising, even entertainment – lies incentives that are no longer driven by truth but by financial or political interests. This means that information is designed to exploit our ignorance and our vulnerability to sentimental persuasion. Information is no longer primarily truth-guiding.

In this talk, we will describe how our Validity Code, a 13-step system that incorporates both logical analysis and fact-checking, will help people to check the validity of the information that every media delivers.

Our mission is to create a citizen who is not only better informed but has a broader outlook on the world, and, ultimately, is better placed to reconcile.

For the third round in our Trajectory Talks series of free debates we consider this: how important is the presentation of a human body to our experience of virtual realities?

Direct evidence suggests that embodiment is a key factor in immersion and presence within XR. It is important to recognise however that existing design principles around this embodiment betray implicit ableist and heteronormative bias. In cases where creators attempt to move past this, their efforts are often made in the questionable pursuit of empathy and the inhabiting of another’s experience. So whether extended, cross or augmented the virtual space is as problematic as the traditional performance space when it comes to perspective and representation.

Starting with the lived expertise of makers with different or changing experiences of their own bodies or identities, this Trajectory Talk will examine and debate current and future uses of embodiment in XR. We will ask what insights can be inferred when decontextualizing narrative and design elements from LGBTQ+ makers and makers with disabilities, and to what extent these forms of embodiment effect meaningful representation.

SPEAKERS

  • Rob Eagle (Chair), PhD researcher at UWE Bristol, uses methods from audio documentary storytelling, immersive theatre and interactive digital art to present nonbinary and genderqueer narratives in mixed reality.
  • Jane Gauntlett, whose work explores the impact of storytelling, shared experience and human connection. She works as a writer, director, producer and lecturer (interactive audio, interactive theatre, game, 360 film, VR, MR). In 2009 she founded the In My Shoes project, each piece combines multi-sensory theatre, technology and first-person documentary to recreate extraordinary real-life events.
  • Michelle Baharier, whose artistic practice is influenced by her heritage and life experience, brings new context to a space and gives a voice to people whose stories are hidden and unheard. Since 2006 she has worked collaboratively developing The Largactyl Shuffle. This project is named after Chlorpromazine, one of the first anti-psychotic drugs, whose side effects included a deterioration of motor functions that often manifest in a slow shuffling walk. In 2011, she was commissioned by Southwark Council’s Public Realm Department to create a sculpture on Camberwell Green – representing CoolTan Arts. Using a two part process, we created a live sculpture - a Ginkgo tree to mark the Largactyl Shuffle and to symbolise positive mental health, resilience and memory. She then worked with artist Rossen Daskalov to produce a bench that celebrated all that Largactyl Shuffle represents for the local community – a place of safety, contemplation, friendship and destigmatisation.

RUNNING ORDER

  • 6.30-7pm: Arrivals, drinks, nibbles and networking.
  • 7-8pm: Debate and ‘fishbowl’ discussion.
  • 8-9pm: Drinks and networking.

Steering session for London Tech Workers Coalition, a coalition of workers in and around the tech industry. London chapter of @TechWorkersCo

Open to all tech workers, students and those seeking work in the industry. Bring a friend.

if you’ve any questions or requirements email us at techworkersldn {at} protonmail {dot} com

Join us at our first ever HackThePress social!

We’ll spend some time talking about what we all want to get out of the group - learning, networking, or something else entirely. Then there will be plenty of time to get to know your fellow tech and news nerds over booze and food.

We’re looking forward to meeting you there!

Help us to beta test two workshops in applied mathematics:

Workshop 1: Intro to Bayesian Statistics (50 mins)

The first half of this session will focus on the base rate fallacy, building intuitions of how it affects probabilities. In the second half we’ll compare Bayesian and frequentist methods of inference and consider the advantages/disadvantages of each.

Workshop 2: Can Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) stop the AIDs epidemic? (50 mins)

We’ll read a paper that makes some exciting claims about the possibility of ending the global AIDs epidemic. With a small amount of contextual knowledge, we’ll look at the paper with a critical reviewer’s eye to see what we make of its methods and claims.

Hear a digital marketing expert blow the whistle on deceitful tactics used by digital advertisers and show us how we can “opt out” of the corporate surveillance economy.

We’ll also receive an update about Open Rights Group’s AdTech complaint against Google and the Interactive Advertising Bureau.

This event is a great way to learn easy and practical ways to protect yourself online from companies that aggressively target and track you across the Internet.

Bring your laptops and mobile phones so you can use what you learn immediately.

Our planet is in ecological crisis and everyday we are seeing the effects of increasing climate breakdown. Yet from Heathrow expansion to debates over land use, time and again the environmental movement comes up against barriers to achieving the significant systemic change that is needed.

To secure democratic consent for the significant actions we will need to take, we need to understand how to bring more people into the conversation and reach out beyond the activist base. This means exploring how we can create a positive vision of a greener future for everyone in society.

How can we get people to understand the scale and urgency of the challenge without them feeling hopeless? How can we understand and more effectively counter right wing populism and conspiracy theories which deny climate change? At this meet up we’ll be looking at how we can start working together more concretely to solve some of these pressing challenges.

If you know someone who you think needs to be in the room, please do invite them too! We’re really keen to hear from a range of perspectives across the movement and working at different levels.

Drinks and refreshments will be provided.

Every other Tuesday we will be meeting up to collaborate on projects, to discuss progress and to learn together. This is a meetup for engineers of all stripes (hackers, makers, designers and other technologists) who wish to contribute their spare time and talents to radical projects, or work on their own projects. The evening will kickoff with a short introduction round, after which you can proceed to work on your own project, join someone else’s or join one of ours.

What is a radical project? Here at Radical Engineers, we have been seeking and contacting organisations which aim to fundamentally change our economic, political and social systems to enhance human autonomy and social equality. We discuss their projects and clarify any technical challenges or needs they may have so that when they are presented to you, our community, you know that they are properly considered and genuinely useful. Our vetting process means that you will only be working on projects which will help not just to fix the symptoms of our economic systems, but aim to contribute to systemic change itself.

Not an engineer? That’s ok too! You would be surprised at the variety of skills needed for projects. Spreadsheet sprites, word wizards and pixel pirates are valued guests and we could always use a hand scoping out new projects!

See some projects Radical Engineers are working on.

The solar power industry is growing remarkably fast worldwide, with over 100GW installed for the first time in 2018 and over 120GW expected in 2019. This is largely driven by rapidly dropping costs and increasing competitiveness of solar electricity with gas and coal in many countries, almost regardless of action on climate change. Over the past decade, the price of solar modules has fallen over 90% and the big challenges for solar power have moved beyond the cost of electricity, to much bigger questions about the future of electricity.

A new book, Solar Power Finance Without the Jargon, introduces key concepts in finance and renewable energy and provides a readable introduction to the world of business as it applies to solving the energy portion of climate change. It covers startup culture from a personal angle, some less successful examples of solar companies with candid interviews of the founders, and explanations of concepts like levelised cost of energy, the power markets and the experience curve.

Author Jenny Chase, head of solar analysis at financial information provider BloombergNEF, has been tracking solar price, demand, technology and investment since 2006 and aims to write the book she should have read as a student wanting to work in clean energy. This evening will be a chance to meet the author and talk about renewable energy with like-minded people.

The book is available from publisher World Scientific Publishing here and on Amazon here.

New social media communities have bred a renewed interest in radical politics, particularly among the youth generation. Will this culture persist only online, or can we bring our digital communities into the real world to bolster left-wing struggle here?

Join Left Culture Club’s panel event, where we talk about the benefits and pitfalls of using social media to organise online in the digital age.

  • Angie Speaks is an anarchist video essayist and Youtuber.
  • BadmanMassive is a video producer for Zero Books and Means TV UK, and host of the YouTube-based Spicy Takes series.
  • Xexizy (aka. Muke) is a Marxist vlogger and streamer, and founder of the Marxist society at the University of Sussex.

Doors are at 7:00 for a 7:10 start. All are welcome!

The current system of monetisation disincentivises investigative journalism in favour of clickbait and sensationalism. We must find a new model - perhaps technology can help make high quality journalism sustainable again?

A two day hackathon. See the schedule and register your place at hackthepress.org/2019-hackathon/.

Wandsworth Young Labour + London Young Labour trial a new format for a workshop, focused on developing policy solutions to Youth Violence.

A reading group focusing on systems management, where an organisation or group is considered as one or more living systems and this perspective is used to assess how such a system could be structured to function at the highest level possible. This could consider multiple facets of the system, including the individuals working in the system, physical environment, virtual spaces used, tools available, media used for communication, how teams are structured and how information travels, is processed and stored (and more)!

The general intention is that by developing our ability to understand systems we’ll be better equipped to improve (or at least assess) the organisations or groups we work in or with, whether not-for-profit, corporate, or government.

The book for this month is Seeing like a State by James Scott.

We meet roughly monthly on a weekday evening to eat and discuss that month’s book, including its ideas and any practical applications (the day of the week varies). There is no set reading list - the next book is generally chosen at the meeting. Past books include Thinking in Systems (Meadows) and Doing the Impossible (Slotkin).

With the prospect of a general election becoming ever more likely, now more than ever we need to build bridges between technologists and activists on the ground.

Join Campaign Lab for our event Campaign Confessions where we invite candidates, organisers and activists from across the country to share their campaign challenges and where they think Campaign Lab volunteers can help.

For our event, we’ll be joined by Patrick Alcantara & Joe Morrison who are leading the local campaign to unseat Boris in Uxbridge, and Jessie Joe Jacobs one of the Labour Candidates for Tees Valley Mayor, where Labour lost a lot of ground to the Tories in the last election. Our third speaker is to be confirmed.

During the panel and breakout session we’ll explore how the speakers are currently running their campaigns, their current practices in an effort to identify where there is space for innovation and improvement - asking our candidates and activists: how can the Campaign Lab community help their campaigns to innovate?

Campaign Lab is a community of activists, researchers and technologists working towards a more evidence-based approach to campaigning - outside of this event series we run monthly hackdays and meetups, come join us.

A networking event for those applying technology to the upcoming UK election to talk about ideas, resources, strategy and collaborations.

If you have something you want to share with everyone attending, please add it to electiontechhandbook.uk

A meetup for effective altruists who work in/are interested in software, data or tech.

  • 6:30pm: Doors open
  • 7:00pm: Coworking time and/or networking

This month there will be time for co-working if you wish, bring a laptop and feel free to work on EA-related projects with likeminded folks! Otherwise, you’re welcome to use the time for networking as normal.

Note: This event is targeted at people who already know about Effective Altruism. If you’re new to EA, start with one of the newcomer socials advertised here: https://www.facebook.com/LondonAltruism/

The first meeting of the Equality Discussion Group, where there shall be a discussion on Angela Y. Davis’ book “Women, Race, and Class”.

Future books, podcasts, things to watch will be discussed and chosen by the group each time for the next event.

NB. Don’t worry if you won’t have read the whole book - it doesn’t matter.

Every other Tuesday we will be meeting up to collaborate on projects, to discuss progress and to learn together. This is a meetup for engineers of all stripes (hackers, makers, designers and other technologists) who wish to contribute their spare time and talents to radical projects, or work on their own projects. The evening will kickoff with a short introduction round, after which you can proceed to work on your own project, join someone else’s or join one of ours.

What is a radical project? Here at Radical Engineers, we have been seeking and contacting organisations which aim to fundamentally change our economic, political and social systems to enhance human autonomy and social equality. We discuss their projects and clarify any technical challenges or needs they may have so that when they are presented to you, our community, you know that they are properly considered and genuinely useful. Our vetting process means that you will only be working on projects which will help not just to fix the symptoms of our economic systems, but aim to contribute to systemic change itself.

Not an engineer? That’s ok too! You would be surprised at the variety of skills needed for projects. Spreadsheet sprites, word wizards and pixel pirates are valued guests and we could always use a hand scoping out new projects!

See some projects Radical Engineers are working on.

An informal meetup for people interested in effective altruism and want to work on their own projects or self study.

This may be as individuals or in groups, but we plan to work for 50+ minutes then break at least once and maybe up to three times depending on how much you want to do, with the rest of the evening set aside for socialising and discussing what you’re working on with others.

Note: This event is targeted at people who already know about Effective Altruism. If you’re new to EA, start with one of the newcomer socials advertised here: https://www.facebook.com/LondonAltruism

A day of coding to help the Liberal Democrats HQ, The Association of Liberal Democrat Councillors, and local parties around the country get more done and win more votes.

This event is hosted by The Liberal Democrat Software Group - join to hear about future events.

There will be free pizza for lunch.

Meet people working with Wikidata, learn to use SPARQL to query the database and visualise data in interesting ways! Please bring a laptop to work on.

This is the fourth Wikidata meetup organised by Wikimedia UK at Newspeak House. We hope to support the community of people working with Wikidata and encourage new people to get involved in the project.

This event will be aimed at training people to query Wikidata using SPARQL, a coding language similar to SQL which is commonly used to query databases. SPARQL is not a complicated coding language, and the basics of it can be learned easily, especially if you have previous experience of working with data. This event is aimed at people who want to learn the basics of data science, or people already working in that field.

Wikidata is becoming increasingly important, and data science skills are increasingly sought after by employers in the tech sector. This training will help you get acquainted with some basic concepts in data science, or improve your skills at working with and visualising data.We think this could especially appeal to people studying data science, data journalism or any other data-related field, as well as established data scientists and journalists who want to improve their skills.

Non-alcoholic refreshments will be provided.

If you have a Wikidata project you’re working on and would like to do a 5-10 minute presentation on, please contact me about it - [email protected]

Raise money for the next round of outsourced worker strikes at the University of London

This special TechforGood side-event follows on from our last meetup, which we had to cut short because of the heat: https://www.meetup.com/techforgood/events/263194160/

You don’t have to have attended the first event to come along to this one, and you can see the outputs of that event here: http://bit.ly/TFGJulAllAssets

For this August meetup, the Cyberdelic Society (whose co-founder Carl M Smith spoke at last month’s event) will host a Collective Intelligence summit in order to explore how immersive technologies can be radically recontextualised to help tackle some of the grand challenges humanity is currently facing.

The Cyberdelic Society will set the scene by sharing the outputs from our recent XR for XR event which explored how immersive technologies can be utilised to help combat the climate and extinction crisis. The full video of the XR for XR event is available here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RzwfzwaI81Q

Help us build the collective intelligence around Tech for Good solutions by sharing your opinions, ideas and skills. What are the most relevant areas of concern for you? We look forward to this process of collectively co-creating.

KEY QUESTIONS:

  • How do we ensure technologies are part of the solution rather than the source of the problem?
  • How are we going to use the power of technology to radically change lives and the environment for the better?
  • How can we use technology to help us imagine and realise the level of transformation needed to meet the challenges we face?

KEY CONCERNS:

  • How can we avoid replacing imagination with computer animation?
  • What do our current imaging and sensing technologies already do to our perception of reality?
  • If our senses are enhanced or augmented will we become distracted – or more mindful and connected?
  • What are the biological and psychological risks of altering your perception with technology?
  • Is transformative technology just a shortcut for people who lack the willpower for consistent work with their bodies, breath, meditation and sitting in silence?
  • Do AR/VR/MR/AI (XR) experiences endanger people from getting lost further inside the simulation?
  • Do Cyberdelics promise a ‘shortcut’ to a false experience of ‘awakening’/‘enlightenment’?
  • Why rely on something external when we have all the answers, power and ability to be conscious co-creators of this ‘world’/’reality’ within ourselves?

POTENTIAL APPLICATION AREAS:

  • How can we use immersive tech to both measure the impact we are having on our environment and also explore some appropriate systems change solutions?
  • How can we use immersive tech to expand our experience of ourselves and the reality we live in?
  • How can we create truly transformative experiences within these immersive technologies?
  • How can these technologies help us to reprogram our associations and see ourselves from other perspectives (including the non-human)?
  • How can we design and use these technologies to contribute to individual and collective awakening?
  • What is the healing potential of these technologies?
  • How can hybrid technological devices, of often-prosthetic alienation, help us to reconnect to ourselves and to the surrounding environment?
  • To what extent can we influence our internal processes and bodily sensations using external sources? How adaptable is our perception?
  • How much can we understand the rules that govern our minds and bodies through these technologies?
  • How can artificial senses be used to access a greater dynamic range of reality?

If there is appetite, this may form the first in a series of follow-ups along this theme, led by the Cyberdelic Society.

Every other Tuesday we will be meeting up to collaborate on projects, to discuss progress and to learn together. This is a meetup for engineers of all stripes (hackers, makers, designers and other technologists) who wish to contribute their spare time and talents to radical projects, or work on their own projects. The evening will kickoff with a short introduction round, after which you can proceed to work on your own project, join someone else’s or join one of ours.

What is a radical project? Here at Radical Engineers, we have been seeking and contacting organisations which aim to fundamentally change our economic, political and social systems to enhance human autonomy and social equality. We discuss their projects and clarify any technical challenges or needs they may have so that when they are presented to you, our community, you know that they are properly considered and genuinely useful. Our vetting process means that you will only be working on projects which will help not just to fix the symptoms of our economic systems, but aim to contribute to systemic change itself.

Not an engineer? That’s ok too! You would be surprised at the variety of skills needed for projects. Spreadsheet sprites, word wizards and pixel pirates are valued guests and we could always use a hand scoping out new projects!

See some projects Radical Engineers are working on.

How did Facebook allow an obscure data company named Cambridge Analytica hack the 2016 US presidential election? Why did they do it? What have been the consequences for democracy?

In this enlightening documentary join film makers Karim Amer and Jehane Noujaim as we explore the motivations of some of the key players in the story and the journey of those that tried to hold them to account.

Featuring some familiar Newspeak House community faces, this is a must see for anyone interested in increasingly murky intersection between politics, data and ethics in elections.

Popcorn will be provided.

“You leave with a very clear sense of how one company aided and abetted the selling of democracy down the river, not to mention having your fingernails chewed down to the quick.” - David Fear, Rolling Stone

“An intelligent but infuriating piece of liberal hand-wringing.” - Owen Gleiberman, Variety

Climate disaster and far-right politics continue to pose an increasing threat in Britain, the rest of our continent and the world. It is time to act. Time to get organised.

DiEM members and supporters from London and the surrounding area will gather on the 8th of August for a third time - this time in the Newspeak House in Bethnal Green, where we will continue to discuss DiEM policy, how to get organised and the future of Europe.

The overarching goal will be to set up AT LEAST ONE new London local group!

There will be a loose agenda for the evening, including a “creative space” at the end of our meet-up.

Considering the great interested in the “Green New Deal for Europe”, our plan to tackle the threat of climate disaster and the burning injustices in Europe and beyond, you can find out more about it here: https://www.gndforeurope.com/

A reading group focusing on systems management, where an organisation or group is considered as one or more living systems and this perspective is used to assess how such a system could be structured to function at the highest level possible. This could consider multiple facets of the system, including the individuals working in the system, physical environment, virtual spaces used, tools available, media used for communication, how teams are structured and how information travels, is processed and stored (and more)!

The general intention is that by developing our ability to understand systems we’ll be better equipped to improve (or at least assess) the organisations or groups we work in or with, whether not-for-profit, corporate, or government.

The book for this month is The Field Guide to Understanding Human Error, by Sidney Dekker.

We meet roughly monthly on a weekday evening to eat and discuss that month’s book, including its ideas and any practical applications (the day of the week varies). There is no set reading list - the next book is generally chosen at the meeting.

Past books include Thinking in Systems (Meadows) and Doing the Impossible (Slotkin).

Prototype games to explore complex systems. Today we explore the game loop in Baba Is You.

Every other Tuesday we will be meeting up to collaborate on projects, to discuss progress and to learn together. This is a meetup for engineers of all stripes (hackers, makers, designers and other technologists) who wish to contribute their spare time and talents to radical projects, or work on their own projects. The evening will kickoff with a short introduction round, after which you can proceed to work on your own project, join someone else’s or join one of ours.

What is a radical project? Here at Radical Engineers, we have been seeking and contacting organisations which aim to fundamentally change our economic, political and social systems to enhance human autonomy and social equality. We discuss their projects and clarify any technical challenges or needs they may have so that when they are presented to you, our community, you know that they are properly considered and genuinely useful. Our vetting process means that you will only be working on projects which will help not just to fix the symptoms of our economic systems, but aim to contribute to systemic change itself.

Not an engineer? That’s ok too! You would be surprised at the variety of skills needed for projects. Spreadsheet sprites, word wizards and pixel pirates are valued guests and we could always use a hand scoping out new projects!

See some projects Radical Engineers are working on.

A meetup for effective altruists who work in/are interested in software, data or tech.

  • 6.30 pm: Doors open
  • 7 pm: Talks
    • Vicky Clayton (Senior Researcher, Nesta): the desirability of automating impact measurement
    • Ozzie Gooen (Research Scholar, FHI Oxford): Forecasting infrastructure and Foretold, a new forecasting app

Note: This event is targeted at people who already know about Effective Altruism. If you’re new to EA, start with one of the newcomer socials advertised here: https://www.facebook.com/LondonAltruism/

Are you digitally able? A videographer? A copy writer? A social media mastermind? London Green Party has put together a Green Party Hackathon on the 3rd August to help put together a digital campaign from scratch.

Work with Sian Berry to put together a housing campaign designed to push the Mayor and local Councils to take radical Green backed action!

Spaces are limited so please fill out this form to let us know how you want to contribute. We’ll be in touch to confirm places.

Join us for a day of making, playing, failing, and doing as we take a Hackathon and a Scratch Night and smash them together.

About this event

We invite those from the arts and technology worlds, as well as anyone interested in different ideas and new approaches, to come along to this open and relaxed forum for the creation and testing of work that combines digital and immersive technology with artistic practice.

The Hack strand will be a chance for tech people and art people to get together to test an idea, iterate on a concept or demonstrates a method none of which existed at the beginning of the day. They’ll be working away all day and will show off what they’ve created at the open sharing session.

We will give you the chance to try out work in development from those participating in the Scratch strand. Similar to traditional theatre scratch nights we invite direct and collaborative feedback from audiences, but with the pieces growing and changing throughout the day. The Scratch space will be open to the public for free from 12 – 5pm, no sign up required.

The day will culminate in an open sharing session at 5:30pm before we head to Newspeak’s terrace to reflect on the work of the day over a BBQ and drinks.

Further details and participant details to follow. Sign up so you don’t miss out.

Though our open call has now closed there may still be possibilities to participate - get in touch via [email protected]

About your hosts

Trajectory Theatre are interactive digital performance makers. We produce work for both site-specific physical and virtual spaces. Our interests centre around interpersonal connection, the future of the digital era, and challenging notions of reality through perception. To get in touch please reach out on Twitter, or email us at [email protected]

Why fight for a just digital future if there might be no future at all?

Technology crisis and climate crisis have many aspects in common: they are both often invisible, yet pervasive in their impact. Whether it is privacy, bias in AI or open data, the digital human rights community often fights for more equal and just futures while vastly ignoring the environmental crisis we are currently facing.

In this meet up series we want to initiate, map and advance the intersection between digital human rights and climate crisis. That means that we want to figure out how to create a sustainable social, environmental and technological future. By that we aim to go beyond current debates in the community that include arguments such as 1) we need to fly less 2) we need to repair devices 3) bitcoin consumes too much energy. We want to figure out how topics such as bias in AI or open source can be combined with the very idea of sustainability. We want to deepen the intersection between technology and nature.

At this first Sustainable Tech Meetup in London Katrin will give a short introduction with some initial thoughts on the topic. Then we will discuss how the intersection of digital human rights and climate crisis can advance. We will collect national and international initiatives that already work at the tech for good/sustainability intersection to make a first overview. Also, we are going to create a roadmap for more research and activism to advocate for a sustainable social, environmental and technological future.

The Sustainable Tech Meet Up and Newspeak are very happy to receive donations. Please bring pen and paper. If you want to contribute with an input or if you have any questions contact Katrin on Twitter at @KatrinFritsch, private messages are open.

“We have developed an immensely powerful technology. We have stronger means of changing the physical universe than has ever existed before. How are we going to use it? This whole attitude of using technology as a method of fighting the world will succeed only in destroying the world. Technology and its powers must be handled by… people who cherish… above all, the Earth, and treat it with the reverence that is due to one’s own body.” - Alan Watts

How are we going to use the power of technology to radically change lives for the better? That’s a question we will explore in this meetup to really find out if we’re thinking and acting radical enough in applying technology to solve the world’s most pressing social and environmental challenges. Tech for Good is certainly gaining mainstream recognition and popularity, but so is our collective appreciation and recognition of the scale of existential threats facing humanity.

How can we use technology to help us imagine and realise the level of transformation needed to meet the challenges we face? Who is involved? Who needs to be? This event will look at some more ambitious and consciousness-shifting applications and explorations within tech.

The event will start with speakers, then open out into a facilitated ‘citizens assembly’ style discussion where we invite you to bring your ears and ideas.

As always, we’ll have our community announcements at the end, which is a chance for attendees to share an update, funding opportunities, jobs and more with the community. If you’d like to share yours in advance with the organisers, email us at mail@techforgood.tv.

We charge £3 (+VAT) to help manage the number of people who show up on the night, which goes towards the cost of running the event. We don’t want this to become a barrier to attendance, so please get in touch via Meetup messages or directly via mail@techforgood.tv if this causes a problem for you. Furthermore, if you need a VAT receipt please email mail@techforgood.tv.

Our speakers are:

Cassie Robinson, National Lottery Community Fund / The Point People / Tech for Good Global / CAST / Nesta New Radicals Awards: Cassie wears multiple hats in the tech for good space, which gives her a rare perspective on the field and the changes within it. She’ll discuss some of the key burning questions she feels we should all be asking, and who’s working to answer them currently. She’ll set the scene for the citizens assembly discussion around different possible futures, and the challenges we must overcome to get there.

Carl H Smith, Ravensbourne University London / The Cyberdelics Society / The London Experimental Psychonautics Club / Contextology: Carl is a regular writer and speaker on Humanism, Transhumanism and Hyper-Humanism, and how a new mental model can help us better shape our relationship with technology and the world around us. He will share examples of where mixed reality and other XR technologies are enabling positive context engineering, as well as new modes of thinking and embodiment. He will also share the outputs from a recent XR for XR event, hosted by the Cyberdelics Society which explored how immersive technologies can be utilised to help combat the climate and extinction crisis.

We hope to see you there!

Dama & Ellie (Bethnal Green Ventures + CAST)

Register Here

When we talk about technology we always talk about the future—which makes it hard to figure out how to get there. In her new book Future Histories, Lizzie O’Shea argue that we need to stop looking forward and start looking backwards. Weaving together histories of computing and social movements with modern theories of the mind, society, and self, the book constructs a “usable past” that help us determine our digital future.

What, she asks, can the Paris Commune tell us about earlier experiments in sharing resources, that might hold relevance for similar concepts today, like the Internet? Can debates over digital access be guided by Tom Paine’s theories of democratic economic redistribution? And how is Elon Musk not a visionary but a throwback to Victorian-era utopians?

Future Histories has been described by Claire L. Evans as “a potent, timely, and unrepentantly radical reminder of history’s creative potential.” O’Shea will be talking about some of the questions raised by her book and how we can use history to fight for a democratic digital tomorrow.

https://www.versobooks.com/books/2960-future-histories

Often referred to as one of the fathers of systems thinking, Dr John Gall was the first to articulate the counterintuitive nature of systems, in particular how they succeed and how they fail. He is best known for his seminal work The Systems Bible. A Renaissance man, as well as writing on systems, John worked as a paediatrician writing books on parenting, child development, historical novels and memoirs.

Join Newspeak House in warmly welcoming his wife Carol Gall for a special guest lecture celebrating John’s work and their life together.

Carol Gall married Dr Gall in 1994 and for many years worked in his medical office. Together they taught parenting classes and jointly authoring Hit by a Low-Flying Goose a book about their experiences. She has worked as a piano teacher, a special education teacher and tutor, a family counsellor, specialising in young offenders and as a lecturer in child development and music.

In this lecture Carol will explore some of John’s later thinking laid out in his unpublished work and share stories that illustrate some of the many concepts raised in The Systems Bible. Alongside this she will share some of the many personal biographical anecdotes and memories of her life with John that inspired his thinking around systems. The listener does not need a background in systems theory to enjoy and learn from this lecture about John’s life and work.

Labour for a Public Vote is setting up an independent, activist-led grassroots organisation to fight Brexit and promote a left wing remain and reform agenda, called Remain and Reform: Grassroots. They’re proposing a predominantly non-hierarchical structure which they hope will encourage autonomy and engagement - in short, you’re encourage you to get involved, and take a lead on the issues that you’re passionate about.

They are eliciting ideas from across the UK, and from across Europe, in order to develop a transformative agenda that can win widespread public support for our EU membership, and which can win support for the changes needed to make our economy fairer, our societies safer and more secure, and to help us stop climate chaos.

They’re looking for activists who want to be there at the start of this journey, and want to help shape this project from the outset. If this sounds like you, come to their first organising meeting when they’ll discuss all this and more in an open and friendly setting.

Presenting the community powered tourism platform Fairbnb.coop, and kicking off the search for someone to develop the London node!

Fairbnb.coop platform cooperative is a community-centred alternative to current vacation rental platforms that prioritises people over profit and offers the potential for authentic, sustainable, and intimate travel experiences.

As a community of engaged citizens, researchers, and people coming from a variety of professional backgrounds and different cities we have been working together for several years to create the platform, and the beta version is finally nearly ready to be released.

We are now looking for like minded people to foster the creation of Local Nodes in towns and cities in the UK.

If you’re interested in finding more about what this involves you can find more info here.

While in London for LONDON UNBOUND 2019 we are organising a meet up and our co-founders will be delighted to meet whoever is interested to participate in this co-creation process.

This will be the first of a series of events part of a European roadshow that will span over the next 15 months with the goal to involve as many communities as possible in our project.

Programme of the meet up::

  • 6:00 pm: Doors open
  • 6:30 pm: Presentation of Fairbnb.coop project
  • 7:00 pm: Co-creation Workshop in small groups
  • 7:45 pm: Food and drink, chill

Every other Tuesday we will be meeting up to collaborate on projects, to discuss progress and to learn together. This is a meetup for engineers of all stripes (hackers, makers, designers and other technologists) who wish to contribute their spare time and talents to radical projects, or work on their own projects. The evening will kickoff with a short introduction round, after which you can proceed to work on your own project, join someone else’s or join one of ours.

What is a radical project? Here at Radical Engineers, we have been seeking and contacting organisations which aim to fundamentally change our economic, political and social systems to enhance human autonomy and social equality. We discuss their projects and clarify any technical challenges or needs they may have so that when they are presented to you, our community, you know that they are properly considered and genuinely useful. Our vetting process means that you will only be working on projects which will help not just to fix the symptoms of our economic systems, but aim to contribute to systemic change itself.

Not an engineer? That’s ok too! You would be surprised at the variety of skills needed for projects. Spreadsheet sprites, word wizards and pixel pirates are valued guests and we could always use a hand scoping out new projects!

See some projects Radical Engineers are working on.

Brave Conversations was created to bring thinking around Web Science and the Social Machine to mainstream conversations that occur in everyday life. Its objective is to demystify the world of emerging technologies and enable an exploration of the impact that these technologies will have on our selves, our communities, our societies and our planet.

We deliberately create a space where everyone can be brave, can say the things that they know need to be said, and be prepared to apply intellectual rigour to challenging ideas that might take us to uncomfortable places.

Background

In 2008 a group of people from industry, government, academia, and the community sectors came together to create the first Brave Conversations (then called the Meta conference) to create a forum for people to discuss and debate the emerging issues related to humans and their use of digital technologies.

At about the same time a group of luminaries from the Web world were creating Web Science in order to focus interdisciplinary research on precisely the same thing.

Since that time the world has changed.

The Web has evolved from being read-only to read-write and now dominates how the majority of society interacts with digital platforms, giving rise to the largest companies of the modern era. These companies are now pushing the boundaries for how data and information are used and are becoming a key driver for the next step in human evolution.

We can all feel that the world ahead is very different from the world behind, but:

  • How often do we find the time to step back, to engage in robust and challenging dialogue and debate with others from diverse backgrounds about what sort of future we want to create?
  • How often do we feel that our opinions are respected, that we have the space to imagine real possibilities, and that we can take some proactive control of the world that is emerging?

Objectives

The goal of Brave Conversations is to challenge everyone who participates - regardless of what background they come from, or what their skillset and expertise are - to more fully explore and understand the interplay between humans, the societies we live in, and the technologies we have created.

We want to empower people to proactively make decisions about how we live our everyday lives, how we participate as commercial actors within the economy, and how we operate as digital citizens and exercise our political rights. That empowerment comes from demystifying data and information and understanding how it informs the everyday decisions which gradually create the future.

Each of those decisions begin on an individual human level - our bodies and our minds - and then emanates out to our families, communities, societies and from there to nation states. We are all responsible for the world we are creating and never has there been a time when we have more potential to influence the changes around us. But we need to be given the space for robust debate and respectful curiosity, learning from each other, playing with ideas, and asking the questions that are both confronting and potentially will take us to uncomfortable places.

How it works

The best way to learn is through experience and the act of playing with ideas.

We have deliberately chosen to partner with Newspeak House to co-host Brave Conversations London 2019 to build on the work we have been doing around the world over the past two years. Our aim is to enable that teams of diverse participants to critically examine our current societies through the lens of systems, communications, governance and technology.

This is important as the Geopolitics of Political Governance is now playing itself out as the Internet and the Web become more enmeshed in how regimes govern.

Brave Conversations complements the work being done at Newspeak House to address the challenges and opportunities which face contemporary society.

A new public service - and how we plan to make it

How do we better create a culture of mutual aid, reciprocity, co-operation, and collaboration in our cities?

How can more public social eating spaces be made and how can they be more inclusively designed?

At a time when public services are increasingly under threat, can we create an entirely new one?

The National Food Service is a new idea. A public system emerging from a network of social eating spaces across the UK. The goal is to enable social eating spaces to better interrelate, tackle common issues as a unified body, and provide a collaborative, inclusive welfare system for all.

Join members of the NFS Campaign as they explain their vision for the organisation, detail the progress so far, and invite the audience to contribute their ideas to the project.

This event is free to attend. Donations for the evening meal are optional, and not expected. Please email ‘‘[email protected]’’ about dietary requirements.

Running order:

  • 18.00: Doors open
  • 18.30: Campaign update - What is the NFS, and what have we been doing?
  • 19.00: Group discussions
  • 20.00: Dinner is served

Follow the campaign on:

more onion is an award winning digital agency behind the Campaignion platform, which delivers high-impact digital campaigns and fundraising for progressive non-profits. Come and meet the more more onion team as well as fundraisers and campaigners from across the UK charity sector.

ON THE AGENDA

  • New Campaignion features - thank you page overlays, custom redirects and more
  • Campaign showcase - how Compassion in World Farming have gathered over a million signatures for their #EndTheCageAge European Citizen’s Initiative
  • Consultation report launch - be the first to see tips, best practice and case studies from Young Minds, Stonewall, Open Rights Group and more on helping your supporters take part in public consultations

Please Register: https://www.more-onion.com/en/campaignion-london-july19

For those who are new to Campaignion (or fancy a refresh!), please feel free to join us a little earlier at 2.00pm for a demo.

A year since launching, the London Renters Union is establishing itself as a powerful union where renters can get organised and win the big changes to the housing system we all need.

We’re now looking to grow and expand the union so we can organise in new places, get more people involved and build the power of renters.

To do that, we need YOU!

Join us for an evening of training and planning.

We’ll be talking about how we can communicate in ways that encourage people to get involved in organising, and how we can do street stalls and other outreach effectively.

We’ll also be planning some exciting stalls and outreach for over the summer. Bring your diaries so you can leave with some dates for exciting outreach in it!

No experience of activism or the LRU is required to join this session!

Childcare is available if needed, please let us know in advance by emailing [email protected]

A meetup for effective altruists who work in/are interested in software, data or tech.

Come to chat with other EAs about doing the most good with tech. After our first successful run of having talks last time, we’ll return with another exciting talk this time.

  • 6.30 pm: Doors open
  • 7 pm: Talks
    • Michal Trziesimich (Rethink Charity, Local Effective Altruism Network): How LEAN rebooted the EAHub, a social platform for effective altruists
    • Mark Somerset (Freelance software engineer): How to find freelance work as a software engineer

Note: This event is targeted at people who already know about Effective Altruism. If you’re new to EA, start with one of the newcomer socials advertised here: https://www.facebook.com/LondonAltruism/

Millions and millions of people across the UK say they are sometimes, or always, lonely. Many older people say they go more than a month at a time without speaking to friends or family.

It’s thought to be as bad for you as being obese and even smoking.

At The Reader we have spent more than 20 years getting people of all ages reading great literature aloud together because it gives us the opportunity to read more and read differently.

Storytelling is an ancient human practice and, done in this way, it allows us to imagine a future beyond screens.

The Reader has launched a unique collaboration with Hackney Libraries to get people of all ages reading great literature aloud together.

If you’ve been wanting ‘something more’ in your life, you can train to use this powerful practice to change your local community.

Come to Newspeak House on Monday 8 July from 7pm to 8.30pm for a conversation about why getting together in real life matters more than ever, followed by a Shared Reading taster.

Stop scrolling.

Email: [email protected] to book.

Please note - you will need to bring a laptop to this event

Since June 2018 we’ve been a busy bunch, the Campaign Lab community has sourced hundreds of demographic and austerity impact datasets, developed scrapers and written parliamentary questions and FOIs to source the more hard to get datasets. We’ve built a comprehensive UK ward-level election results dataset and begun comparing factors impacting elections across the country.

But we’re not finished yet. Come and join us for our next hackathon as we continue to build the case for an evidenced-based approach to electoral